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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/14/2024 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    Socrates was pronounced by the ancient Oracle as the wisest of his time. His philosophy was all about overcoming our ignorance and living a good life. From his teachings, many lines of philosophy were born. Ancient Stoicism was born out of Socratic wisdom. In the last decade there has been an explosion of interest in Stoicism worldwide. While ‘lowercase s’ stoicism conveys the idea of being unemotional or emotionally suppressed, ‘capital S’ Stoicism is a philosophy and ancient wisdom that dates back over 2000 years. Albert Ellis famously quoted the Roman philosopher Epictetus who said, “Men are not disturbed by things, but by their view of things.” Hundreds of years prior to Epictetus, Chrysippus wrote the first CBT book called On Emotions which detailed how our emotional reactions were influenced by our interpretations of situations (thoughts). There is a wealth of Stoic wisdom that CBT has yet to capitalize on. Notably, the goal of Stoicism is to tolerate discomfort and focus on living a good life that is in line with your values. In this way, Stoicism is actually more compatible with mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches like modern Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This webinar will focus on the methods of Socrates (Socratic Questioning) and the lived philosophy that was born from his work (Stoicism). This talk is being offered as a fundraiser for the World Confederation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies. Dr Scott Waltman will be speaking as a Global Ambassador of that organization. The talk will be geared toward clinicians, Stoics, and mental health consumers.

    image

    Thursday, March 14, 2023

    12:00 PM- 2:00 PM Eastern/ 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Central/ 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM Mountain/ 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Pacific

    2 APA CE Credits Awarded

    $0 Student ABCT/IACBT Members* / $50 ABCT/IACBT Members* / $75 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    *IACBT members and student members: please contact rlamb@abct.org if you need assistance in registering at the correct price.*


    Abstract:

    Socrates was pronounced by the ancient Oracle as the wisest of his time. His philosophy was all about overcoming our ignorance and living a good life. From his teachings, many lines of philosophy were born. Ancient Stoicism was born out of Socratic wisdom. In the last decade there has been an explosion of interest in Stoicism worldwide. While ‘lowercase s’ stoicism conveys the idea of being unemotional or emotionally suppressed, ‘capital S’ Stoicism is a philosophy and ancient wisdom that dates back over 2000 years. Albert Ellis famously quoted the Roman philosopher Epictetus who said, “Men are not disturbed by things, but by their view of things.” Hundreds of years prior to Epictetus, Chrysippus wrote the first CBT book called On Emotions which detailed how our emotional reactions were influenced by our interpretations of situations (thoughts). There is a wealth of Stoic wisdom that CBT has yet to capitalize on. Notably, the goal of Stoicism is to tolerate discomfort and focus on living a good life that is in line with your values. In this way, Stoicism is actually more compatible with mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches like modern Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This webinar will focus on the methods of Socrates (Socratic Questioning) and the lived philosophy that was born from his work (Stoicism). This talk is being offered as a fundraiser for the World Confederation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies. Dr Scott Waltman will be speaking as a Global Ambassador of that organization. The talk will be geared toward clinicians, Stoics, and mental health consumers.

    Presenter Biography:

    Scott H Waltman, PsyD, ABPP, is a clinician, international trainer, and practice-based researcher. His interests include evidence-based psychotherapy practice, training, and implementation in systems that provide care to underserved populations. He is president-elect of the Academy of Cognitive & Behavioral Therapies. He is also a board member of the International Association of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies. He is board certified in Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology. Dr. Waltman, worked as a CBT trainer for one of Dr. Aaron Beck’s CBT implementation teams in the Philadelphia public mental health system. Currently, he works as a clinical psychologist in private practice and a managed care system, where he is a frontline clinician and practice-based researcher. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe one framework for Socratic Questioning

    2. Troubleshoot two common challenges to Socratic Questioning

    3. Describe the connection between Socrates, ancient Stoicism, and Modern CBT

    4. Use a least two Stoicism strategies in current practice

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Clark, G. I., & Egan, S. J. (2018). Clarifying the role of the Socratic method in CBT: A survey of expert opinion. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 11, 184-199.

    2. Kazantzis, N., Fairburn, C. G., Padesky, C. A., Reinecke, M., & Teesson, M. (2014). Unresolved issues regarding the research and practice of cognitive behavior therapy: The case of guided discovery using Socratic questioning. Behaviour Change, 31(1), 1-17.

    3. Kazantzis, N., & Stuckey, M. E. (2018). Inception of a discovery: Re-defining the use of Socratic dialogue in cognitive behavioral therapy. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 11, 117-123.

    4. Vittorio, L. N., Murphy, S. T., Braun, J. D., & Strunk, D. R. (2022). Using Socratic questioning to promote cognitive change and achieve depressive symptom reduction: evidence of cognitive change as a mediator. Behaviour research and therapy, 150, 104035.

    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to rlamb@abct.org

    The International Association of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The International Association of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Pediatric anxiety disorders are common, with prevalence rates ranging from 9-20% (Bitsko et al., 2022; Costello, Egger, & Angold, 2005). Excessive symptoms of anxiety that are impairing but do not meet diagnostic thresholds are also common (Costello & Shugart, 1992; Rapee et al., 2012) and the COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant increases in anxiety (and other youth mental health problems; Ravens-Sieberer et al., 2021; Castagnoli et al., 2020). Moreover, it is well established that untreated anxiety has a broad range of negative effects on academic, social, and familial functioning (Swan & Kendall, 2016). Despite the high prevalence of impairing anxiety, the majority of these youth remain unidentified and untreated. One approach to address the service utilization gap, is to deliver interventions in schools. School-based interventions improve access to care –especially for youth in rural and under-resourced communities where mental health specialists are sparse. This webinar will present the basic components of school-based interventions for youth with anxiety. The talk will also focus on efforts to enhance the capacity of non-mental health specialists, such as school nurses and teachers, to assist youth with anxiety.


    image


    Original Air Date: Thursday, February 8, 2024

    11:00 AM- 12:30 PM Eastern/ 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM Central/ 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM Mountain/ 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM Pacific

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency


    Abstract:

    Pediatric anxiety disorders are common, with prevalence rates ranging from 9-20% (Bitsko et al., 2022; Costello, Egger, & Angold, 2005). Excessive symptoms of anxiety that are impairing but do not meet diagnostic thresholds are also common (Costello & Shugart, 1992; Rapee et al., 2012) and the COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant increases in anxiety (and other youth mental health problems; Ravens-Sieberer et al., 2021; Castagnoli et al., 2020). Moreover, it is well established that untreated anxiety has a broad range of negative effects on academic, social, and familial functioning (Swan & Kendall, 2016). Despite the high prevalence of impairing anxiety, the majority of these youth remain unidentified and untreated. One approach to address the service utilization gap, is to deliver interventions in schools. School-based interventions improve access to care –especially for youth in rural and under-resourced communities where mental health specialists are sparse. This webinar will present the basic components of school-based interventions for youth with anxiety. The talk will also focus on efforts to enhance the capacity of non-mental health specialists, such as school nurses and teachers, to assist youth with anxiety.

    Presenter Biography:

    Golda S. Ginsburg, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry at University of Connecticut School of Medicine, has been developing and evaluating interventions for youth with a range of psychiatric disorders for over 25 years. A primary focus of her research has been on identifying the best approach to treat and prevent pediatric anxiety disorders—one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in youth. Dr. Ginsburg was a leader of the landmark NIMH-funded multisite comparative trial examining the relative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, their combination, and pill placebo for pediatric anxiety disorders. She was also the Principal Investigator (PI) of the multi-site follow up study examining the long-term outcomes of youth treated in this study. Dr. Ginsburg’s current work focuses on the dissemination of evidenced-based treatments for pediatric anxiety (as most youth with anxiety do not receive treatment). For instance, with funding from NIMH and the US Department of Education, she developed a modular CBT intervention for school clinicians and conducted a large RCT trial to evaluate its effectiveness. In addition, she recently developed a school-nurse intervention to improve their ability to identify and reduce anxiety in youth and previously completed a study developing a brief anxiety reduction intervention delivered by pediatricians in primary care settings.  She also recently developed a teacher-delivered intervention for students with excessive anxiety and is now developing an intervention to support students with anxiety as they transition from elementary to middle school. Dr. Ginsburg has also focused her efforts on preventing the onset of anxiety disorders and has developed and tested an anxiety preventive intervention for offspring of anxious parents; she was funded by NIMH to examine the long-term follow up of these youth as well. Dr. Ginsburg’s lab at UConn—the Child and Adolescent Anxiety and Depression Program (CAMP; website: CAMP Lab | UConn Health) recently completed a clinical trial in community mental health clinics comparing three different talk therapies for adolescents with anxiety and/or depression—a project with the University of Miami. She has been the PI or Co-PI on over 10 federally and/or privately funded clinical trials, including the large NIMH-funded landmark multi-site clinical trials for depression (Treatment of Adolescent Depression Study; TADS) and Tourette’s (Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics; CBIT).  

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Identify at least one anxiety-specific assessment tool.

    2. Identify at least one evidence-based intervention strategy for reducing student anxiety.

    3. Identify two benefits of school-based interventions for anxiety.

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Ginsburg, G. S. & Smith, I. (2023). Interventions for students with anxiety. In Evans, S. Owens, J. Bradshaw, C. & Weist, M. (EDs). Handbook of School Mental Health - Innovations in Science and Practice, Third Edition. Springer Publishers.

    2. Conroy, K., Hong, N., Poznanski, B., Hart, K.C., Ginsburg, G.S., Fabiano, G.A., & Comer, J.S. (2022). Harnessing home-school partnerships and school consultation to support youth with anxiety disorders. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 29, 381-399.

    3. Piselli, K., Pella, J. E., Chan, G., & Ginsburg, G. S*. (2022). The teacher anxiety program for   elementary students: Open trial results. Education and Treatment of Children, 45, (1) 33-50.

    4. Ginsburg, G. S*. Pella, J. Slade, E. (2022) Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of School-Based Treatments for Anxiety Disorders. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, 25, 91-103.

    5. Ginsburg, G. S*., Drake, K. L., Muggeo, M.A., Stewart, C. E., Pkulski, P.J., Zheng, D., & Harel, O. (2021). A pilot RCT of a school nurse delivered intervention to reduce student anxiety. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 50 (2) 177-186. DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2019.1630833

    About the Moderator: 

    Emily Becker-Haimes, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Mental Health and the clinical director of the Pediatric Anxiety Treatment Center at Hall Mercer, which is the only specialty anxiety clinic in Philadelphia dedicated to serving youth in the public mental health system. She is an implementation scientist and clinical psychologist whose research and clinical work is dedicated to improving mental health service quality in specialty mental health settings for youth.  Dr. Becker-Haimes received her doctoral degree in child clinical psychology from the University of Miami. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania.


    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124









    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop describes ethical issues in treating suicidal patients and distinguishes between the roles of laws, risk management, and ethics. Using safety planning-type interventions as an example, the presenter will illustrate how psychotherapists can enhance the quality of their interventions by paying particular attention to ethical principles.


    Dr. Samuel Knapp

    Original Airdate: Friday, January 19, 2024

    11:00 AM- 12:30 PM Eastern/ 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM Central/ 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM Mountain/ 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM Pacific

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency


    Abstract:

    This workshop describes ethical issues in treating suicidal patients and distinguishes between the roles of laws, risk management, and ethics. Using safety planning-type interventions as an example, the presenter will illustrate how psychotherapists can enhance the quality of their interventions by paying particular attention to ethical principles.

    Presenter Biography:

    Samuel Knapp is a retired psychologist who was the Director of Professional Affairs for the Pennsylvania Psychological Association from 1987 to 2021. He also taught in the doctoral programs in psychology at Lehigh University and the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. He has written many books and made many presentations on ethics, self-care, and suicide prevention.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Identify the ethical principles related to the treatment of suicidal patients.

    2. Describe the importance of applying ethical principles, such as respect for patient decision-making, when working with suicidal patients.

    3. Design better safety planning-type interventions and lethal means counseling sessions by focusing on respect for patient autonomy.

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Bryan, C. J. (2022). Rethinking suicide. Oxford. 

    2. Knapp, S., Younggren, J., VandeCreek, L., Harris, E., & Martin, J. (2013). Assessing and managing risk in psychological practice: An individualized approach. (2nd ed). The Trust. 

    3. Knapp, S., & Fingerhut, R. (2023). Practical ethics for psychologists: A positive approach. American Psychological Association. 

    4. Knapp, S. (2023). Lethal means counseling for suicidal firearm owners. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, 53(4), 279-287. http://doi.org/10.1007/s108979-023-09588

    5. Knapp, S. (2023). The essentials of creating effective safety-planning type interventions for suicidal patients. Practice Innovations, 8(2), 131-140.  http://doi.org/10.1037/pri0000...

    6. Knapp, S. (in press). Laws, risk management, and ethics when working with suicidal patients. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice

    7. Knapp, S. (in press). Listen, explain, involve, and evaluate: Why respecting patient autonomy benefits suicidal patients. Ethics and Behavior, http://doi.org/10.1080/10508422.2022.215338

    8. Nuij, C., van Ballegooijen, W., de Beurs, D., Juniar, D., Erlangsen, A., Portzky, G., O’Connor, R. C., Smit, J. H., Kerkhof, A., & Riper, H. (2021). Safety planning-type interventions for suicide prevention: meta-analysis. British Journal of Psychiatry, 219(2), 419-426. http://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2021.50

    9. O’Connor, R. (2021). When it is darkest. Vermillion. 


    About the Moderator: 

    Jeremy Tyler, Psy.D., is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Tyler is the Director of Psychotherapy for the Penn Medicine Outpatient Psychiatry Center, Director of the Penn Medicine TEAM Clinic, and the Director of Postdoctoral Training at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety. Dr. Tyler’s clinical expertise is in the delivery of evidence-based therapies for OCD, PTSD, and anxiety disorders. Dr. Tyler’s research interests include understanding the role of transdiagnostic mechanisms involved in the treatment of anxiety-related disorders, including OCD and PTSD, with a particular interest in the role of anxiety sensitivity, perfectionism, and emotion regulation. 


    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124













    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Despite the proliferation of evidence-based psychological interventions and other effective services in global mental health, there has been a lack of standardized approach to measure competency of non-specialist and specialists providing mental health services. Moreover, governments, national professional organizations, and training institutions have not had a mechanism to ensure that providers are delivering safe and effective care. To address this gap, the World Health Organization and UNICEF have developed Ensuring Quality in Psychological Support and Mental Health Services (EQUIP). EQUIP is an initiative with a suite of easy-to-use competency assessment tools in standardized role plays and a digital platform for providing real-time visualizations and feedback to improve training and supervision. In this webinar we will provide an introduction to EQUIP and provide examples of its use in various contexts and sectors, including in pre service education settings.

    image

    The World Confederation of CBT (WCCBT) 

     invites you to view a Free Recorded Webinar - 

     An introduction to the W.H.O-UNICEF  

     Ensuring Quality in Psychosocial and Mental Health Support  

     (EQUIP) Initiative

     Presented by: Dr. James Underhill 

     EQUIP Project Coordinator  

    Department of Mental Health and Substance Use 

     World Health Organization (W.H.O.) 

    Moderator: Dr. Lata McGinn 

     President, World Confederation of CBT (WCCBT) 

     

    Free Registration 

    *This free webinar does not offer CE credit*


    Original Airdate:

    Wednesday, December 20, 2023 

    4:00 PM- 4:50 PM Eastern 


    Abstract:

    Despite the proliferation of evidence-based psychological interventions and other effective services in global mental health, there has been a lack of standardized approach to measure competency of non-specialist and specialists providing mental health services. Moreover, governments, national professional organizations, and training institutions have not had a mechanism to ensure that providers are delivering safe and effective care. To address this gap, the World Health Organization and UNICEF have developed Ensuring Quality in Psychological Support and Mental Health Services (EQUIP). EQUIP is an initiative with a suite of easy-to-use competency assessment tools in standardized role plays and a digital platform for providing real-time visualizations and feedback to improve training and supervision. In this webinar we will provide an introduction to EQUIP and provide examples of its use in various contexts and sectors, including in pre service education settings.

    Presenter Biography:

    Dr James Underhill is a clinical psychologist and the Ensuring Quality in Psychological Support (EQUIP) Project Coordinator for the WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Use. He also supports the department with its work on scalable psychological interventions and digital mental health.

    James has extensive experience in clinical and humanitarian work, creating and developing innovative services for trauma and GBV survivors, refugee populations and adolescents involved in serious youth violence.

    In his role as EQUIP coordinator, James has been centrally involved in the development and public release of the EQUIP digital platform (https://equipcompetency.org/en-gb) which is part of a joint WHO/UNICEF project to improve the competence of helpers and the consistency and quality of training in psychological interventions and service delivery.


    Recommended Readings:

    1. Kohrt, B. A., Jordans, M. J. D., Rai, S., Shrestha, P., Luitel, N. P., Ramaiya, M. K., Singla, D. R., & Patel, V. (2015). Therapist competence in global mental health: Development of the ENhancing Assessment of Common Therapeutic factors (ENACT) rating scale. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 69, 11–21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.03.009

    2.  Jordans, M., Steen, F., Koppenol-Gonzalez, G., El Masri, R., Coetzee, A., Chamate, S., Ghatasheh, M., Pederson, G.A., Itani, M., El Chammay, R., Schafer, A., and Kohrt, B. (2022). Evaluation of competency-driven training for facilitators delivering a psychological intervention for children in Lebanon: A proof-of-concept study. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, 31, E48. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2045796022000348

    3. Kohrt, B. A., Schafer, A., Willhoite, A., van’t Hof, E., Pedersen, G. A., Watts, S., Ottman, K., Carswell, K., & van Ommeren, M. (2020). Ensuring quality in psychological support (who equip): Developing a competent global workforce. World Psychiatry, 19(1), 115–116. https://doi.org/10.1002/wps.20704 


    ****************************************

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124







    *************************

    For more information, contact:

    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org

    *************************

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Savoring is the purposeful enjoyment of positive emotion. It involves generating, amplifying, and sustaining pleasant emotions from enjoyable experiences. Those with anxiety disorders and depression not only have deficits in positive emotion and reward response (e.g., LaFreniere & Newman, 2019), but also tend to dampen pre-existing positive emotions (e.g., Eisner et al., 2009). Intentional engagement with positive emotions may counter core symptoms and maintenance factors of psychopathology. Recently, savoring practices have shown significant clinical benefits when compared to active treatment controls in both randomized controlled trials (RCTs; e.g., Craske et al., 2019; LaFreniere & Newman, 2023a) and single-session experiments (e.g., Rosen & LaFreniere, 2023). Savoring practices have significantly reduced pre-existing worry, anxiety, depression symptoms, and “kill-joy thinking” in clinical samples. They have also increased positive emotion, prioritization of positive activities, and optimism (LaFreniere, & Newman, 2023a; 2023b; 2023c), which have a host of benefits across life (Fredrickson, 2013). Savoring practices can feasibly complement existing behavioral techniques, weakening symptoms while strengthening joy. In this virtual clinical training workshop, attendees will develop skills for the clinical use of intentional engagement with positive emotions. They will first learn about the theoretical foundations, mechanisms, and empirical support of savoring. Clinical outcomes of savoring practices for anxiety and mood disorders in scientific research will be emphasized. The majority of the workshop will then focus on active training in a variety of savoring practices, tools, and tips. Attendees will also participate in savoring exercises themselves.


    Dr. Luc LaFreniere
    Dr. Luc LaFreniere

    Original Airdate: Friday, December 1, 2023

    11:00 AM- 12:30 PM Eastern/ 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM Central/ 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM Mountain/ 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM Pacific

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency


    Abstract:

    Savoring is the purposeful enjoyment of positive emotion. It involves generating, amplifying, and sustaining pleasant emotions from enjoyable experiences. Those with anxiety disorders and depression not only have deficits in positive emotion and reward response (e.g., LaFreniere & Newman, 2019), but also tend to dampen pre-existing positive emotions (e.g., Eisner et al., 2009). Intentional engagement with positive emotions may counter core symptoms and maintenance factors of psychopathology. Recently, savoring practices have shown significant clinical benefits when compared to active treatment controls in both randomized controlled trials (RCTs; e.g., Craske et al., 2019; LaFreniere & Newman, 2023a) and single-session experiments (e.g., Rosen & LaFreniere, 2023). Savoring practices have significantly reduced pre-existing worry, anxiety, depression symptoms, and “kill-joy thinking” in clinical samples. They have also increased positive emotion, prioritization of positive activities, and optimism (LaFreniere, & Newman, 2023a; 2023b; 2023c), which have a host of benefits across life (Fredrickson, 2013). Savoring practices can feasibly complement existing behavioral techniques, weakening symptoms while strengthening joy.

    In this virtual clinical training workshop, attendees will develop skills for the clinical use of intentional engagement with positive emotions. They will first learn about the theoretical foundations, mechanisms, and empirical support of savoring. Clinical outcomes of savoring practices for anxiety and mood disorders in scientific research will be emphasized. The majority of the workshop will then focus on active training in a variety of savoring practices, tools, and tips. Attendees will also participate in savoring exercises themselves. 

    Presenter Biography:

    Dr. LaFreniere is lead investigator of the Technological Research on Enjoyment and Anxiety Treatment (TREAT) laboratory and an assistant professor at Skidmore College. He specializes in developing and researching efficient interventions for worry, anxiety, and comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders with smartphone technologies. His research aims to design treatments targeting understudied processes of psychopathology, test their efficacy, and examine their mechanisms. Along with winning the sole Distinguished Dissertation in Clinical Psychology Award (APA Division 12) in 2019, he has published in outlets such as Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and Depression and Anxiety. His basic research has revealed Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) deficits in learning the probabilities of future outcomes, reinforcement response under uncertainty, and extended engagement with positive emotions. In his applied research, he has developed and tested efficient interventions for correcting these problems via smartphone with worry tracking and savoring. His Worry Outcome Journal (WOJ) intervention employed an enhanced form of worry outcome monitoring. The efficacious WOJ guided users with GAD to see the high costs, low benefits, and inaccuracies of their worries in daily life via smartphone. His recent SkillJoy intervention led clients to learn and practice extended enjoyment of positive experiences, mindful appreciation of good aspects of the present moment, and exposure to being “off guard." He continues to study the application of savoring practices as a transdiagnostic intervention for comorbid GAD and depression. www.linkedin.com/in/lucas-lafreniere-722aa778

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe the definition and theorized mechanisms of savoring in the treatment of anxiety and depression symptoms

    2. Provide at least 3 findings on the clinical effects of savoring interventions from experimental research

    3. Teach the basic principles and procedures of savoring to clients (provide psychoeducation)

    4. Lead clients in the practice of at least 3 separate savoring techniques/exercises

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Craske, M. G., Meuret, A. E., Ritz, T., Treanor, M., Dour, H., & Rosenfield, D. (2019). Positive affect treatment for depression and anxiety: A randomized clinical trial for a core feature of anhedonia. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 87(5), 457–471. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000396

    2. LaFreniere, L. S. & Newman, M. G. (2023a). Upregulating positive emotion in generalized anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial of the SkillJoy ecological momentary intervention. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000794.

    3. LaFreniere, L. S. & Newman, M. G. (2023b). Reducing contrast avoidance in GAD by savoring positive emotions: Outcome and mediation in a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 93, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2022.102659

    4. LaFreniere, L. S. (2023c). A primer for training savoring skills in psychotherapy (part 1 and part 2): Foundational concepts; Core procedures and exercises. The Evidence-Based Practitioner. https://philabta.org/EBP/13245504

    5. Smith, J. L., & Bryant, F. B. (2017). Savoring and well-being: Mapping the cognitive-emotional terrain of the happy mind. In M. D. Robinson & M. Eid (Eds.), The happy mind: Cognitive contributions to well-being (pp. 139-156). Springer.


    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124





    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop is designed for clinicians with moderate direct clinical experience conducting CBT or ACT with school-aged/teenage youth and caregivers. It’s a universal problem for parents. Their intentions are well-meaning. Their verbally-stated values and personal principles might even be clear and well-reasoned. And yet... in the moment of truth, it can all go wrong. Tempers flare, feelings are hurt, and defensive, angry or avoidant reactions result. How can therapists help parents and caregivers stay true to their values, even when things start to go off course? The current workshop aims to provide a conceptual framework and tools for helping caregivers (a) assess their values, as distinguished from specific goals, and (b) identify common parenting/family interaction traps that impede responding in line with stated values. We will introduce participants to the ACT Matrix (Polk et al., 2016) as a way of assessing, conceptualizing, and illustrating caregivers’ experiences and behaviors as they relate to values. We will provide additional guidance on how to help caregivers articulate their values, using role-plays and experiential exercises. Attendees will then be introduced to common parenting traps (e.g., accommodation cycle; aggressive-coercive cycle; Chu & Pimentel, 2023) and practice using functional analysis to help caregivers identify where they depart from stated values. Finally, we will demonstrate how to integrate values clarification with results from the functional analysis, to present cognitive and behavioral solutions that bring caregivers’ actions back in line with their stated values. The presenters will share worksheets and handouts from Dr. Chu’s newly published text and other sources to illustrate common parent interaction traps and family-based chain analysis. Attendees will also be encouraged to bring local examples for group consultation. Presenters will moderate a discussion of integrating values-based assessment and intervention into their daily practice with families.

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    Laura C. Skriner, Ph.D.

    Clinical Psychologist
    The Center for Stress, Anxiety, and Mood, LLC
    Summit, New Jersey


    Laura A. Rindlaub, Ph.D.

    Founder and Co-Director
    The Center for Stress, Anxiety, and Mood
    Summit, New Jersey


    image

    Brian C. Chu, Ph.D.

    Professor and Clinical Department Chair
    Rutgers University
    Piscataway, New Jersey


    Recorded on Sunday, November 19, 2023 at the 57th Annual ABCT Convention in Seattle, WA

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    Abstract:

    This workshop is designed for clinicians with moderate direct clinical experience conducting CBT or ACT with school-aged/teenage youth and caregivers.

    It’s a universal problem for parents. Their intentions are well-meaning. Their verbally-stated values and personal principles might even be clear and well-reasoned. And yet... in the moment of truth, it can all go wrong. Tempers flare, feelings are hurt, and defensive, angry or avoidant reactions result. How can therapists help parents and caregivers stay true to their values, even when things start to go off course? The current workshop aims to provide a conceptual framework and tools for helping caregivers (a) assess their values, as distinguished from specific goals, and (b) identify common parenting/family interaction traps that impede responding in line with stated values. We will introduce participants to the ACT Matrix (Polk et al., 2016) as a way of assessing, conceptualizing, and illustrating caregivers’ experiences and behaviors as they relate to values. We will provide additional guidance on how to help caregivers articulate their values, using role-plays and experiential exercises. Attendees will then be introduced to common parenting traps (e.g., accommodation cycle; aggressive-coercive cycle; Chu & Pimentel, 2023) and practice using functional analysis to help caregivers identify where they depart from stated values. Finally, we will demonstrate how to integrate values clarification with results from the functional analysis, to present cognitive and behavioral solutions that bring caregivers’ actions back in line with their stated values. The presenters will share worksheets and handouts from Dr. Chu’s newly published text and other sources to illustrate common parent interaction traps and family-based chain analysis. Attendees will also be encouraged to bring local examples for group consultation. Presenters will moderate a discussion of integrating values-based assessment and intervention into their daily practice with families.

    Outline:

    I. Why ACT for parenting?
    1. What is ACT?
    2. Research on its application
    3. What are “values”, and how are they helpful in parenting work?
    II. The Matrix
    1. Role-play demonstration of matrix for parenting
    2. Discuss assessing values with parents
    3. Have participants practice completing a Matrix on their own about a parenting case
    III. Applying Values Clarification and the Matrix to Parenting Dilemmas
    1. Parenting traps and how they interfere with Values-Based Parenting
    2. Seeing the Stuck Spiral in action: Functional Analysis
    3. Using the Analysis to guide a Values-Based response in place of a Stuck Response

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe the difference between values and goals and lead clients through a parenting-based values identification exercise.

    2. Describe the ACT Matrix and apply it to parenting values.

    3. Conduct chain analyses of parent-youth interactions and identify common parenting traps.

    4. Describe basic communication analysis and family problem solving approaches to help families practice values identification and assessing parenting traps.

    5. In the long-term, be able to describe the above lessons and strategies to caregivers when working with youth and family clients.


    Recommended Readings:

    1. Polk, K. L., Schoendorff, B., Webster, M., & Olaz, F. O. (2016). The essential guide to the ACT Matrix: A step-by-step approach to using the ACT Matrix model in clinical practice. New Harbinger Publications 

    2. Raftery-Helmer, J.N., Moore, P.S., Coyne, L., & Reed, K.P. (2016) Changing problematic parent-child interaction in child anxiety disorders: The promise of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 6, 64-69. ,   Chu, B. C., & Pimentel, S. (2023). CBT Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Youth. New York: Guilford Press. [Chapter 5]. 

    3. Byrne, G., Chrada, A.N., O’Mahony, T., & Brennan, E. (2021) A systematic review of the use of acceptance and commitment therapy in supporting parents. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 94, 378-407. 



    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124




    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Acceptance-based behavioral therapy (ABBT) is an umbrella term that encompasses mindfulness-, acceptance-, and contextual-based cognitive therapies (Roemer & Orsillo, 2020). ABBT’s principles and strategies have been adapted to effectively address Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) by reducing GAD, worry, depressive symptoms, and comorbid diagnoses, while also increasing quality of life (e.g., Roemer, Orsillo, & Salter-Pedneault, 2008; Hayes-Skelton, Roemer, & Orsillo, 2013). Further, preliminary studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ABBT’s central elements (i.e., mindfulness and decentering skills, acceptance-based strategies, and values clarification and values-based action) in addressing distress in various contexts, including acculturative and racism-related stress. As a result, we have developed a range of adapted ABBT programs to promote well-being with specific populations. In this workshop, we will present a brief overview of the central principles of ABBT as a foundation for adaptations. We will highlight examples of adaptations to illustrate how these principles may be adapted for use in specific contexts and with specific populations. First, we will discuss adaptations for university students and the way we took ABBT out of therapy room and into in person workshops and online. Then we will share adaptions we made to align with the Latinx student experience. Lastly, we will focus on the ways ABBT can be adapted to address racism-related stress and increase values-based living. We will then engage in a group activity to develop new adaptations that audience members’ can use in their own contexts. This workshop is open to clinicians across all experience levels, including students and trainees.

    image

    Natalie Arbid, Ph.D.

    Senior Clinical Training Manager
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Pasadena, California

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    Liz Roemer, Ph.D.

    Professor
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    Boston, Massachusetts


    Elizabeth Eustis, PhD (she/her/hers)

    Assistant Research Professor
    Boston University
    Boston, Massachusetts


    Jennifer H. Martinez, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor
    Suffolk University
    Boston, Massachusetts


    Recorded on Sunday, November 19, 2023 at the 57th Annual ABCT Convention in Seattle, WA

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    Abstract:

    Acceptance-based behavioral therapy (ABBT) is an umbrella term that encompasses mindfulness-, acceptance-, and contextual-based cognitive therapies (Roemer & Orsillo, 2020). ABBT’s principles and strategies have been adapted to effectively address Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) by reducing GAD, worry, depressive symptoms, and comorbid diagnoses, while also increasing quality of life (e.g., Roemer, Orsillo, & Salter-Pedneault, 2008; Hayes-Skelton, Roemer, & Orsillo, 2013). Further, preliminary studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ABBT’s central elements (i.e., mindfulness and decentering skills, acceptance-based strategies, and values clarification and values-based action) in addressing distress in various contexts, including acculturative and racism-related stress.

    As a result, we have developed a range of adapted ABBT programs to promote well-being with specific populations. In this workshop, we will present a brief overview of the central principles of ABBT as a foundation for adaptations. We will highlight examples of adaptations to illustrate how these principles may be adapted for use in specific contexts and with specific populations. First, we will discuss adaptations for university students and the way we took ABBT out of therapy room and into in person workshops and online. Then we will share adaptions we made to align with the Latinx student experience. Lastly, we will focus on the ways ABBT can be adapted to address racism-related stress and increase values-based living. We will then engage in a group activity to develop new adaptations that audience members’ can use in their own contexts. This workshop is open to clinicians across all experience levels, including students and trainees.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe the central principles of an ABBT approach to well-being and health promotion.

    2. Identify contextual barriers that may impact the adaptation of ABBTs.

    3. Apply ABBT adaptation strategies for use in their own clinical settings.


    Recommended Readings:

    1. Roemer, L. & Orsillo, S. M. (2020). Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy: Treating Anxiety and Related Challenges. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

    2. Hayes-Skelton SA, Roemer L, Orsillo SM. A randomized clinical trial comparing an acceptance-based behavior therapy to applied relaxation for generalized anxiety disorder. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2013 Oct;81(5):761-73. doi: 10.1037/a0032871. Epub 2013 May 6. PMID: 23647281; PMCID: PMC3783580.   

    3. Roemer L, Orsillo SM, Salters-Pedneault K. Efficacy of an acceptance-based behavior therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: evaluation in a randomized controlled trial. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2008 Dec;76(6):1083-9. doi: 10.1037/a0012720. PMID: 19045976; PMCID: PMC2596727.,   ,  



    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Parental and caretaker accommodation in pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is common. It is also known to contribute to greater symptomatology and complicate treatment. While interventions such as SPACE and exposure and response prevention (ERP) focus on specific techniques to target parental and caretaker accommodations, there is less available explicit guidance on its specific functions, causes, and maintaining factors. While arguably not directly necessary for treatment, a deeper understanding of the various functions and processes involved in this type of accommodation may afford greater clinical improvement. Through direct validation of caregivers and targeting of the drives for parental action tendencies, clinicians may be better equipped to facilitate reductions in accommodation behaviors and/or the generation of more effective response substitutions.


    image

    Katherine Durham, Ph.D.

    Director of Clinical Assessment
    Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute
    Montvale, New Jersey

    image

    Paula K. Yanes-Lukin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor
    Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute
    River Vale, New Jersey


    Recorded on Sunday, November 19, 2023 at the 57th Annual ABCT Convention in Seattle, WA

    1.5 CE Credits Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    Abstract:

    Parental and caretaker accommodation in pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is common. It is also known to contribute to greater symptomatology and complicate treatment. While interventions such as SPACE and exposure and response prevention (ERP) focus on specific techniques to target parental and caretaker accommodations, there is less available explicit guidance on its specific functions, causes, and maintaining factors. While arguably not directly necessary for treatment, a deeper understanding of the various functions and processes involved in this type of accommodation may afford greater clinical improvement. Through direct validation of caregivers and targeting of the drives for parental action tendencies, clinicians may be better equipped to facilitate reductions in accommodation behaviors and/or the generation of more effective response substitutions.

    Outline:

    1.  Define accommodation
      1.  Discuss family and caregiver accommodation
      2.  Discuss relationship of accommodation to OCD severity and child functioning
    2.  Discuss reasons for accommodation
      1.  Initial causes
        1.  Lack of awareness
        2.  “Normal” responses to child’s anxiety
    3.  Desire to nurture and protect
      1.  Difficult distinction between accommodation and meeting needs
    4.  Modeled behavior from previous generations
      1.  Maintaining factors
        1.  Negative reinforcement
        2.  Short term gain despite long-term consequences
    5.  Limited caregiver/child distress tolerance (DT)
    6.  Limited caregiver/child emotion regulation (ER)
    7.  Interactions between caregiver and child DT and ER
      1.  Enmeshment
    8.  Specific caregiver needs targeted by accommodation
      1. Caregiver’s need to fix or eliminate
      2. “Prevent” worsening/more severe symptoms (e.g., self-injury, suicidality)
      3. Relieve caregiver guilt
      4. Need to feel needed/useful
      5.  Need to feel attached/connected to one another
    9.  How to support caregivers  decrease OCD accommodation:
      1.  Validation
        1.  Specifically, validate the function (to provide love in the best way they know how)
        2.  Also, validate the emotions (difficult to see your child distressed or dysregulated)
      2.  Build insight and provide psychoeducation
        1.  Explaining how accommodation relates to OCD
        2.  Exploring accommodation specific to family
      3.  Address each need and offer alternatives
        1.  Need to fix:
        2. Problem-solving creates feeling of control
        3. Prevent worsening/more severe symptoms:
        4. Psychoeducation on these thoughts and behaviors as attempt to (poorly) problem solve
        5. Discuss importance of experiencing distress and joining with the child instead of eliminating it immediately
        6.  Relieve guilt:
        7.  Describe acting from love vs. guilt/fear
        8. Need to feel useful:
        9.  Find other helpful ways to alleviate child’s needs
        10. Need to feel attached/connected:
        11.  Look for other ways to connect and express love/affection appropriately


    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Identify various factors contributing to the development of parental and caregiver accommodation among families receiving treatment for pediatric OCD.

    2. Using techniques such as validation, values work, and affect attunement, participants will learn to work with parents and caretakers to increase insight and cultivate ability to engage in mindful caretaking.

    3. To increase relevance and deepen understanding of concepts, participants will provide examples of the functions contributing to and maintaining patterns of parental/caregiver accommodation in the families with whom they work.

    4. Long-term goals: Clinicians will be able to empathize with caregivers’ need to provide accommodation and understand its various functions.

    5. Long-term goals: Clinicians will learn to validate caregivers and target accommodations directly to provide practical and effective solutions.


    Recommended Readings:

    1. Wu, M.S., McGuire, J.F., Martino, C., Phares, V., Selles, R.R., & Storch, E.A. (2016). A meta-analysis of family accommodation and OCD symptom severity. Clinical Psychology Review, 45, 34-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2016.03.003  

    2. Murphy, Y.E. & Flessner, C.A. (2015). Family functioning in paediatric obsessive compulsive and related disorders. British Journal Clinical Psychology, 54, 414-434. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjc.12088

    3. Kagan, E. R., Frank, H. E., & Kendall, P. C. (2017). Accommodation in youth with OCD and anxiety. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 24(1), 78–98. https://doi.org/10.1111/cpsp.12186



    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124



    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
    *************************
  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A key goal of implementation science (IS) is to increase access to quality mental health services. Despite many notable and important strides achieved, the mental health crisis has only worsened in recent years in the U.S. and many other countries around the world. To address the challenge, implementation science may benefit from refocusing its efforts in several different directions. This keynote will identify these multiple avenues for research, directions with potentially large returns on investment with regard to increasing access to quality mental health services. First, a focus on workforce development, recruitment, and retention, a major challenge for many states and localities, needs additional scholarly attention. Furthermore and relatedly, service financing, especially payment for evidence-based services, would benefit from increased scrutiny by implementation scientists. Last, service coordination systems, grossly underresourced, reliant on limited and out-of-date information, and operating in a mostly opaque manner to families who need services, warrant scientific inquiry. Potential paths to addressing these areas of concern are outlined and examples from ongoing work in Virginia will be highlighted. Last, future directions that implementation scientists could take will be identified.


    image

    Michael A. Southam-Gerow, Ph.D. (he/him/his)

    Professor
    Virginia Commonwealth University
    Richmond, Virginia


    Recorded on Saturday, November 18, 2023 at the 57th Annual ABCT Convention in Seattle, WA

    1 CE Credit Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    Abstract:

    A key goal of implementation science (IS) is to increase access to quality mental health services. Despite many notable and important strides achieved, the mental health crisis has only worsened in recent years in the U.S. and many other countries around the world. To address the challenge, implementation science may benefit from refocusing its efforts in several different directions. This keynote will identify these multiple avenues for research, directions with potentially large returns on investment with regard to increasing access to quality mental health services. First, a focus on workforce development, recruitment, and retention, a major challenge for many states and localities, needs additional scholarly attention. Furthermore and relatedly, service financing, especially payment for evidence-based services, would benefit from increased scrutiny by implementation scientists. Last, service coordination systems, grossly underresourced, reliant on limited and out-of-date information, and operating in a mostly opaque manner to families who need services, warrant scientific inquiry. Potential paths to addressing these areas of concern are outlined and examples from ongoing work in Virginia will be highlighted. Last, future directions that implementation scientists could take will be identified.

    Outline:

    • Context of mental health crisis and efforts to address it
    • Ecological model for implementation
    • Addressing practitioner and provider organization factors
    • Addressing systemic factors
    • Examples from Virginia
    • Future directions to consider

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Identify understudied areas of implementation science

    2. Enumerate multiple ways that science could inform efforts to improve access to mental health services

    3. Describe the relevance of community partnership building, as well as ways to partner

    4. Long-term goals: Identify possible community partners for their research

    5. Long-term goals: Meet with a prospective community partner


    Recommended Readings:

    1. Center for Evidence-based Partnerships in Virginia. (2021). Needs assessment and gaps analysis, 2021 report. Report prepared for the Division of Family Services of the Virginia Department of Social Services. Available online.   

    2. Rodríguez, A., Southam-Gerow, M. A., O’Connor, M. K., & Allin, R. B. (2014). An analysis of stakeholder views on children’s mental health services. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 43, 862-876.   

    3. Sale, R., Wu, J., Robinson, A., Finn, N., Aisenberg, G., Kaur, N., Riso, A., & Southam-Gerow, M. A. (2023). Workforce and other factors impeding implementation and sustainment of FFPSA evidence-based programs: A study of obstacles and opportunities. Report prepared for the Division of Family Services of the Virginia Department of Social Services. Available online



    ****************************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124









    *************************
    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
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  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    My involvement in the traumatic stress field began 49 years ago in 1974 when I helped establish a grass roots rape crisis center in Charleston. The field of traumatic stress did not exist; the PTSD diagnosis was six years in the future, and this work was far from the mental health, public health, and public policy mainstream. Today, the traumatic stress field is as mainstream as you can get, and I have been privileged to be a participant-observer in the field’s challenges and triumphs as it developed. Much progress has been made in understanding the scope, nature, and mental/behavior health consequences of exposure to a broad range of potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and in developing effective interventions. However, there still is a lack of public awareness about these issues and of sufficient public policy support to provide access to the types of information, interventions, and help that survivors need. In this presentation, I will describe key lessons learned based on my own research, clinical, media, and public policy adventures in the field, and I will offer some thoughts about how to best address the challenges of today as well of tomorrow. My adventures have taken me from the research lab to the clinic, from volunteer nonprofits to professional organizations, from the National Press Club to the National Academies of Sciences, and from testifying at Congressional hearings to being honored by the President at the Rose Garden. Lessons learned are: 1) good research is key to past and future success; 2) research alone does not generate the changes we need in public awareness and public policy; 3) working with news media to disseminate research information can improve public awareness about traumatic stress and survivors’ needs, which is critical to achieving needed public policy changes; 4) success is a team sport that requires collaboration with many partners; and 5) nothing happens without dedication, persistence, high frustration tolerance, hard work, and a lot of help from your friends. I will summarize several key findings from our research, describe how they were used to increase public awareness and influence public policy, and conclude with thoughts about relevance of this for improving clinical training and practice.

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    Dean G. Kilpatrick, Ph.D.

    Medical University of South Carolina
    Charleston, South Carolina

    Recorded on Saturday, November 18, 2023 at the 57th Annual ABCT Convention in Seattle, WA

    1 CE Credit Awarded

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    All prices listed in US currency

    Abstract:

    My involvement in the traumatic stress field began 49 years ago in 1974 when I helped establish a grass roots rape crisis center in Charleston. The field of traumatic stress did not exist; the PTSD diagnosis was six years in the future, and this work was far from the mental health, public health, and public policy mainstream. Today, the traumatic stress field is as mainstream as you can get, and I have been privileged to be a participant-observer in the field’s challenges and triumphs as it developed. Much progress has been made in understanding the scope, nature, and mental/behavior health consequences of exposure to a broad range of potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and in developing effective interventions. However, there still is a lack of public awareness about these issues and of sufficient public policy support to provide access to the types of information, interventions, and help that survivors need. In this presentation, I will describe key lessons learned based on my own research, clinical, media, and public policy adventures in the field, and I will offer some thoughts about how to best address the challenges of today as well of tomorrow. My adventures have taken me from the research lab to the clinic, from volunteer nonprofits to professional organizations, from the National Press Club to the National Academies of Sciences, and from testifying at Congressional hearings to being honored by the President at the Rose Garden.
    Lessons learned are: 1) good research is key to past and future success; 2) research alone does not generate the changes we need in public awareness and public policy; 3) working with news media to disseminate research information can improve public awareness about traumatic stress and survivors’ needs, which is critical to achieving needed public policy changes; 4) success is a team sport that requires collaboration with many partners; and 5) nothing happens without dedication, persistence, high frustration tolerance, hard work, and a lot of help from your friends. I will summarize several key findings from our research, describe how they were used to increase public awareness and influence public policy, and conclude with thoughts about relevance of this for improving clinical training and practice.

    Outline:

    1. 1. Overview
      1.  Brief history of traumatic stress field.
      2.  Definition of public policy and how it influences our ability to serve our clients and patients.
      3.  Advantages of epidemiological research and examples of such research our team has conducted.
      4. Why publishing/presenting research finding to other researchers is not sufficient to increase public awareness/change public policy.
      5. Examples of using research finding to increase public awareness or change public policy incorporating selected excellent adventures.
      6.  Lessons learned and thoughts about the future.
    2. Brief history of traumatic stress field.
      1. From nonexistent in 1974 to mainstream today.
      2. b. Relevant to many issues including survivors of war, disasters, violent crime, child abuse, serious accidents, exposure to toxic substances, terrorism, and mass violence.
    3. Definition of public policy and how it influences our ability to serve our clients and patients.
      1. Definition of public policy: “a system of laws, regulatory measures, courses of action, and funding priorities concerning a given topic that is promulgated by a governmental entity or its representatives. Public policy is accomplished through enactment of legislation, regulation, and funding priorities”. (Kilpatrick and Ross, 2001)
      2.  Examples of how public policy influences ability to serve clients and patients (e.g., criminal laws against child abuse, IPV, and sexual violence; laws establishing crime victims rights including compensation and compensation for veterans; laws establishing eligibility and funding for mental health services)
    4. Advantages of epidemiological research and examples of epidemiological research our team has conducted.
      1.  Advantages: Can provide population-based data documenting extent and nature of problem, treatment seeking, disparities in access to treatment, and normal course of resilience/recovery without treatment.
      2.  Examples: List of major epi studies done by our research group.
      3. Overview of major research findings.
      4. Overview of major research findings.
    5. 5. Why publishing/presenting research findings to other researchers is not sufficient to increase public awareness/change public policy.
      1. a. “Civilians”, including policy makers, do not read our journals or attend our meetings.
      2. b. Even if they did, our professional jargon makes our work difficult to understand, and we rarely address public policy implications of our work.
    6. Using research to increase public awareness/influence public policy incorporating selected adventures:
      1. Examples: ( Crime victim research, CV Bill of Rights, and payment for rape exams; Rape in America Report, changes in National Crime Victimization Survey, and participation in RAND study of sexual assault/sexual harassment in military; America/SC Speaks Out surveys and SC Crime Victims Bill of Rights Constitutional Amendment.
      2. Adventures: National Press Club, National Academy of Sciences, Congressional Testimony, and trip to the Rose Garden.
    7.  Lessons learned:
      1. Good research key but not sufficient.
      2.  Research alone doesn’t generate needed changes in public awareness to change public policy
      3. Working with news media can increase public awareness
      4. Success is team sport, and thanks are due to many for their help and support.
      5. Nothing happens without dedication, persistence, and hard work.
    8. Thoughts about the future:
      1. Our profession cannot flourish without science and reason, and both are under attack; we must use them and defend them.
      2. Science and reason can help society address many of the vexing problems of the day but only if we increase awareness about the value of science and the implications of our findings. There are several ways we can do this.
      3. c. Society expects professionals to deal with tough issues and go the extra mile to do so. We need to learn how to meet this expectation while living healthy, balanced lives.


    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this workshop, the learner will be able to:

    1. Describe advantages of epidemiological research studies in the traumatic stress field for producing information relevant to clinical practice, public awareness, and public policy.

    2. Identify three reasons why publishing or presenting research findings at professional meetings is generally not sufficient to increase public awareness or influence public policy

    3. Discuss ways in which to utilize relevant research findings with news media, professional groups, nonprofit organizations, and policy makers to achieve changes needed to improve services for our clients.

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Rancher, C., Moreland, A. D., Smith, D. W., Cornelison, V., Schmidt, M. G., Boyle, J., ... & Kilpatrick, D. G. (2023). Using the 5C model to understand COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy across a National and South Carolina sample. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 160, 180-186.,   

    2. Andrews, A. R., Jobe-Shields, L., López, C. M., Metzger, I. W., De Arellano, M. A., Saunders, B., & G Kilpatrick, D. (2015). Polyvictimization, income, and ethnic differences in trauma-related mental health during adolescence. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, 50, 1223-1234.,   

    3. Kilpatrick, D. G., Resnick, H. S., Milanak, M. E., Miller, M. W., Keyes, K. M., & Friedman, M. J. (2013). National estimates of exposure to traumatic events and PTSD prevalence using DSM‐IV and DSM‐5 criteria. Journal of traumatic stress, 26(5), 537-547.,   

    4. Reuben, A., Moreland, A., Abdalla, S. M., Cohen, G. H., Friedman, M. J., Galea, S., ... & Kilpatrick, D. G. (2022). Prevalence of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in Flint, Michigan, 5 years after the onset of the water crisis. JAMA Network Open, 5(9), e2232556-e2232556.,   

    5. Zuromski, K. L., Resnick, H., Price, M., Galea, S., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Ruggiero, K. (2019). Suicidal ideation among adolescents following natural disaster: The role of prior interpersonal violence. Psychological trauma: theory, research, practice, and policy, 11(2), 184.



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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificate of completion is included in the cost of the webinar


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    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124




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    For more information, contact:
    Rachel Lamb, ABCT Membership and Marketing Manager
    212-647-1890 ext. 209
    rlamb@abct.org
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