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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 09/30/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This presentation will use national stratified data from a recent Harris Poll to reveal Americans’ attitudes regarding psychology, the scientific basis of our discipline, how psychology compares with other scientific fields, and whether prior educational experience in psychology affects these perceptions. Data offer opportunities for discussions among clinical scientists regarding public education, and behaviors we can engage in as individuals, and as a field, to modify perceptions of psychological science.


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    September 30, 2022

    12:00 pm- 1:30 pm Eastern/ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm Central/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Mountain/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    This presentation will use national stratified data from a recent Harris Poll to reveal Americans’ attitudes regarding psychology, the scientific basis of our discipline, how psychology compares with other scientific fields, and whether prior educational experience in psychology affects these perceptions. Data offer opportunities for discussions among clinical scientists regarding public education, and behaviors we can engage in as individuals, and as a field, to modify perceptions of psychological science.


    About the Presenter:

    Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D., ABPP currently serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Assistant Dean for Honors Carolina at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He served as the Director of Clinical Psychology at Yale University before being recruited to UNC to serve in that same position for over a dozen years.  He is board certified (ABPP) in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.  

    Mitch’s research examines interpersonal models of internalizing symptoms and health risk behaviors among adolescents, with a specific focus on the unique role of peer relationships in the developmental psychopathology of depression and self-injury.  He has served as President of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology and President of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.  He also served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Associate Editor of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and on the executive boards of the American Psychological Association, the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology, the Coalition for the Advancement and Application of Psychological Science, and the publication board of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.  

    Mitch has been recognized for his contributions to research (American Psychological Association Society of Clinical Psychology Theodore Blau Early Career Award, Columbia University/Brickell Award for research on suicidality), classroom instruction (e.g., the UNC Chapel Hill Tanner Award for Undergraduate Teaching, the Psi Chi Professor of the Year Award, the Psychology Club Department Research Mentor Award), for professional development training (APAGS Raymond D. Fowler Award), as a mentor (e.g., ABCT Outstanding Mentor Award, SSCP Lawrence H. Cohen Outstanding Mentor Award), and for his national contributions to education and training at the local, state, and national level (CUDCP Beverly Thorn Award for Outstanding DCT Service).  He also is the author of Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World That Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships, translated into 7 languages and sold in over 150 countries.  Mitch and his work have been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Time, Forbes, CNN, The Atlantic and many other outlets.  


    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, the learner will be able to:

    1. Explain public perceptions of psychology as a science
    2. Design activities that can enhance the public’s appreciation for the scientific basis of psychology
    3. Identify steps that individuals and the field can take to educate the public

    Recommended Readings

    Lilienfeld, S. O. (2012). Public skepticism of psychology: why many people perceive the study of human behavior as unscientific. American Psychologist67(2), 111.

    Kaslow, N. J. (2015). Translating psychological science to the public. American Psychologist70(5), 361.

    Munro, G. D., & Munro, C. A. (2014). “Soft” versus “hard” psychological science: Biased evaluations of scientific evidence that threatens or supports a strongly held political identity. Basic and Applied Social Psychology36(6), 533-543.


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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 09/22/2022 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    The idea that people can be lastingly harmed by their own transgressive behavior and can suffer because of others’ moral failures is as old as humanity, yet these age-old concepts have only recently been considered as clinically relevant social, biological, spiritual, and psychological problems. Moral injury (MI) is the multidimensional outcome from exposure to transgressive harms that undermine foundational beliefs about the goodness and trustworthiness of oneself, others, or the world. Although moral injury has gained widespread acceptance, we have only just recently defined the syndrome and generated a method to measure the syndrome that can be used clinically. I will define the boundary conditions for MI and distinguish MI as a clinical problem in contrast to moral frustration and moral stress, describe the domains impacted by exposure to morally injurious events, provide an assessment tool that can be used clinically and in research, provide case conceptualization heuristics and treatment approaches that can be used when MI is the principal target (e.g., when a traumatic event is a MI) or when another presenting problem is colored by MI, and discuss process issues that arise when clinicians are confronted with the existential realities of grave transgressive behaviors or high stakes systemic failures.


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    September 22, 2022

    2:00 pm- 3:30 pm Eastern/ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central/ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Mountain/ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    The idea that people can be lastingly harmed by their own transgressive behavior and can suffer because of others’ moral failures is as old as humanity, yet these age-old concepts have only recently been considered as clinically relevant social, biological, spiritual, and psychological problems. Moral injury (MI) is the multidimensional outcome from exposure to transgressive harms that undermine foundational beliefs about the goodness and trustworthiness of oneself, others, or the world. Although moral injury has gained widespread acceptance, we have only just recently defined the syndrome and generated a method to measure the syndrome that can be used clinically. I will define the boundary conditions for MI and distinguish MI as a clinical problem in contrast to moral frustration and moral stress, describe the domains impacted by exposure to morally injurious events, provide an assessment tool that can be used clinically and in research, provide case conceptualization heuristics and treatment approaches that can be used when MI is the principal target (e.g., when a traumatic event is a MI) or when another presenting problem is colored by MI, and discuss process issues that arise when clinicians are confronted with the existential realities of grave transgressive behaviors or high stakes systemic failures.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Litz is a clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. He is also the Director of the Mental Health Core of the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiological Research and Information Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Dr. Litz is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the American Psychopathological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1. Participants will learn to define moral injury
    2. Participants will be able to distinguish moral injury from moral frustration, moral distress, and PTSD
    3. Participants will learn how to assess the syndrome of moral injury and how to use a moral injury assessment instrument in practice
    4. Participants will learn about the phenomenology and the clinical needs of individuals with moral injury and ways of helping people to heal and repair moral injury

    Recommended Readings

    Litz, B. T., Stein, N., Delaney, E., Lebowitz, L., Nash, W. P., Silva, C., & Maguen, S. (2009). Moral injury and moral repair in war veterans: A preliminary model and intervention strategy. Clinical Psychology Review, 29, 695–706. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2009.07.003.

    Litz, B. T., & Kerig, P. K. (2019). Introduction to the special issue on moral injury: Conceptual challenges, methodological issues, and clinical applications. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 32(3), 341-349. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.22405.

    Litz, B., & Carney, J. R. (2018). Employing loving-kindness meditation to promote self-and other-compassion among war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. Spirituality in Clinical Practice5(3), 201. https://doi.org/10.1037/scp0000174.


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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 09/16/2022 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death for all individuals in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 35 and 54 (CDC, 2018). Evidence based practice around suicide prevention and treatment can be difficult to understand and implement, causing tension between ethical standards of avoiding harm and practicing within areas of competency with day-to-day clinical obligations. This training seeks to find balance between resolving ethical tensions and increasing competencies regarding the treatment of suicidal patients. Participants will review up-to-date information on best practices for suicidal patients, practice interventions, and use working with suicidal clients as a lens from which discuss ethical codes related to practice.


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    September 16, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death for all individuals in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 35 and 54 (CDC, 2018). Evidence based practice around suicide prevention and treatment can be difficult to understand and implement, causing tension between ethical standards of avoiding harm and practicing within areas of competency with day-to-day clinical obligations. This training seeks to find balance between resolving ethical tensions and increasing competencies regarding the treatment of suicidal patients. Participants will review up-to-date information on best practices for suicidal patients, practice interventions, and use working with suicidal clients as a lens from which discuss ethical codes related to practice.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. White received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Rhode Island and was a fellow at Harvard Medical School before moving to Oregon, where he is a licensed psychologist. His clinical areas of expertise include suicide, clinical risk management, adolescent and family treatment, dialectical behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, and implementation of evidence-based practice. He has extensive research and evaluation experience on both coasts, with specific interests in community-based program evaluation, multilevel modeling, frequent use of psychiatric emergency services, and general evaluation of evidence-based practice. As an advocate of the scientist/practitioner model, he has a strongly held value and passion for the adherent delivery of effective evidence-based treatment, especially for individuals who have experienced barriers to accessing mental health services.

    In addition to clinical services, Dr. White trains internationally on suicide prevention and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and specializes in the implementation of DBT with non-dominant and native populations. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology within the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University, is board certified in DBT through the Linehan Board of Certification, holds ABPP Board Certification in Clinical and Behavioral Psychology, volunteers as a journal reviewer, and volunteers in multiple capacities for the Linehan Board of Certification.

    He is co-owner of the Portland DBT Institute (PDBTI) and serves as the Associate Director.  At PDBTI he works with the management team to set program policy, provides clinical services to adults, adolescents, and families, oversees research and evaluation services, and provides supervision to psychologist residents and clinical staff.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1. Participants will learn general long-term risk and protective factors for suicide
    2. Participants will learn times hospitalization is warranted for suicidal ideation   
    3. Participants will learn resources in the area to draw upon when working with suicidal patients

    Recommended Readings

    Ward-Ciesielski, E. F., & Rizvi, S. L. (2021). The potential iatrogenic effects of psychiatric hospitalization for suicidal behavior: A critical review and recommendations for research. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 28(1), 60.

    Franklin, J. C., Ribeiro, J. D., Fox, K. R., Bentley, K. H., Kleiman, E. M., Huang, X., ... & Nock, M. K. (2017). Risk factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviors: A meta-analysis of 50 years of research. Psychological bulletin, 143(2), 187.

    About the Moderator: Kyle Haney, PhD, is a Senior Staff Psychologist at *NYCBT* in New York City, as well as an educational consultant at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her clinical work focuses on providing CBT and DBT to adolescents and adults with specialized training in anxiety, Borderline Personality Disorder, and trauma treatments.

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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/24/2022

    In recent years, the impact of stress due to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of identity-related discrimination has received greater attention at a national level. This presentation will discuss how to broach the topic of discrimination, provide practical strategies for assessment, and discuss tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions across multiple mental health conditions with cultural sensitivity.


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    June 24, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    Abstract:

    In recent years, the impact of stress due to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of identity-related discrimination has received greater attention at a national level. This presentation will discuss how to broach the topic of discrimination, provide practical strategies for assessment, and discuss tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions across multiple mental health conditions with cultural sensitivity.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Brittany N. Hall-Clark is a Texas-licensed Clinical Psychologist. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hall-Clark completed a 2-year fellowship with STRONG STAR, a multidisciplinary PTSD research consortium. She then became an Assistant Professor within the Division of Behavioral Medicine and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. For 8 years, she worked at the Ft. Hood site of STRONG STAR as a cognitive-behavioral research therapist for several randomized clinical trials focused on PTSD and related conditions in active duty military personnel and veterans. She has been certified as a Master Prolonged Exposure clinician. Currently, she works with the STRONG STAR Training Initiative as a Prolonged Exposure therapy consultant. In addition, she is part of the National Center for PTSD Consultation team. Dr. Hall-Clark is passionate about diversity and cultural sensitivity, evidenced by her focus on cultural factors in treatment, provision of diversity training to graduate students and continuing education for professionals, and culturally-oriented publications and presentations. Her professional interests include translational research, cultural factors related to PTSD and other mental health issues, and racial trauma. Additional clinical specialties include trauma nightmares, insomnia, sleep, and anxiety.  Dr. Hall-Clark also practices privately at InSight Psychology and Behavioral Health Services in Pflugerville, TX.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, participants will:

    1. Attendees will have increased awareness of how to broach the topic of discrimination with clients.  
    2. Incorporate culturally relevant measures into the assessment process. 
    3. Identify at least 3 specific strategies for tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions with cultural sensitivity.  

    Recommended Readings

    Lee, E., Greenblatt, A., Hu, R., Johnstone, M., & Kourgiantakis, T. (2022, February 24). Microskills of Broaching and Bridging in Cross-Cultural Psychotherapy: Locating Therapy Skills in the Epistemic Domain Toward Fostering Epistemic Justice. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ort0...

    Williams, M.T., Haeny, A.M., and Holmes, S.C. (2021) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Racial Trauma (PDF) RQ Vol. 32(1)

    Williams, M. T., Printz, D. M. B., & DeLapp, R. C. T. (2018). Assessing racial trauma with the Trauma Symptoms of Discrimination Scale. Psychology of Violence8(6), 735–747. https://doi-org.libproxy.uthsc...

    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/29/2022

    College students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often display significant deficits in their academic and psychosocial functioning. Such impairments place students with ADHD at increased risk for future negative outcomes during their post-college adult years. Thus, it is critically important for this population to have ready access to evidence-based treatment while attending college. This presentation will begin by providing an overview of what is known about the impact of ADHD on the educational, emotional, social, and personal functioning of college students. Next, a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying these outcomes will be presented. This will be followed by a brief review of currently available treatment options for this population. The remainder of this presentation will focus on a recently developed intervention known as ACCESS – Accessing Campus Connections and Empowering Student Success - to illustrate how cognitive-behavioral therapy strategies can be used to address the multiple treatment needs of college students with ADHD. This discussion of ACCESS will begin by addressing its conceptual underpinnings, its programmatic development and refinement, and the evidence in support of its efficacy derived from an initial open clinical trial and a recently completed multi-site randomized controlled trial. This will be followed by a detailed description of its therapeutic components, along with recommendations for how to implement ACCESS in various campus and off-campus settings.


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    Original Air Date: April 29, 2022

    Abstract:

    College students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often display significant deficits in their academic and psychosocial functioning. Such impairments place students with ADHD at increased risk for future negative outcomes during their post-college adult years. Thus, it is critically important for this population to have ready access to evidence-based treatment while attending college. This presentation will begin by providing an overview of what is known about the impact of ADHD on the educational, emotional, social, and personal functioning of college students. Next, a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying these outcomes will be presented. This will be followed by a brief review of currently available treatment options for this population. The remainder of this presentation will focus on a recently developed intervention known as ACCESS – Accessing Campus Connections and Empowering Student Success - to illustrate how cognitive-behavioral therapy strategies can be used to address the multiple treatment needs of college students with ADHD. This discussion of ACCESS will begin by addressing its conceptual underpinnings, its programmatic development and refinement, and the evidence in support of its efficacy derived from an initial open clinical trial and a recently completed multi-site randomized controlled trial. This will be followed by a detailed description of its therapeutic components, along with recommendations for how to implement ACCESS in various campus and off-campus settings.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Arthur D. Anastopoulos is currently a Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG). Dr. Anastopoulos received his B.A. in Child Study from Tufts University, his M.A. in General/Experimental Psychology from Wake Forest University, and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University. As part of his doctoral training, Dr. Anastopoulos completed a one-year clinical internship at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, where he received specialty training in both Pediatric Psychology and Cognitive Therapy. He began his career as a Staff Psychologist in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Thereafter, he held a nine-year joint appointment in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, where he also served as Chief of the ADHD Clinic founded by Dr. Russell A. Barkley. Since joining the faculty at the UNCG in 1995, Dr. Anastopoulos has directed a nationally recognized ADHD Clinic that has provided state-of-the-art clinical services, clinical training for graduate students from multiple disciplines, and opportunities for participation in clinical research. An active researcher, Dr. Anastopoulos has been an investigator on numerous research grants, including serving as the lead Principal Investigator on two recently completed projects: a 5-year multi-site NIMH funded study entitled, “Longitudinal Outcome of College Students with ADHD,” and a 4-year IES funded multi-site project entitled “Improving the Educational and Social-Emotional Functioning of College Students with ADHD.” Dr. Anastopoulos regularly presents his findings at national and international scientific meetings and has published 90 journal articles, book chapters, and books related to the clinical management of ADHD across the lifespan, with a particular emphasis on the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy for this population. Dr. Anastopoulos has also given more than 250 invited ADHD presentations to various parent groups and educators, as well as medical and mental health professionals.

    Learning Objectives

    Based on the content of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    1. Identify 3 domains of college life functioning commonly impacted by ADHD
    2. Discuss how a “perfect storm” conceptualization helps to explain the challenges faced by college students with ADHD
    3. List the 3 therapeutic components of the ACCESS program hypothesized to be clinical change mechanisms
    4. Describe 3 ways in which symptom presentation/daily functioning may improve following participation in ACCESS

    Recommended Readings

    ACCESS website - Home | Access Project (uncg.edu)

    Anastopoulos, A.D., Langberg, J.M., Eddy, L.D., Silvia, P.J., & Labban, J.D. (2021).  A randomized controlled trial examining CBT for college students with ADHD.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 89 (1), 21–33. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp000...

    Anastopoulos, A.D., Langberg, J.M., Besecker, L.H., & Eddy, L.D. (2020). CBT for College Students with ADHD - A Clinical Guide to ACCESS. Springer.

    Anastopoulos, A.D., DuPaul, G.J., Weyandt, L.L., Morrissey-Kane, E., Sommer, J.L., Rhoads, L.H., Murphy, K.R., Gormley, M.J., & Gudmundsdottir, B.G.  (2018). Rates and patterns of comorbidity among first-year college students with ADHD. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 47, 236–247. doi: 10.1080/15374416.2015.1105137

    DuPaul, G.J., Gormley, M.J., Anastopoulos, A.D., Weyandt, L.L., Labban, J., Sass, A.J., Busch, C.Z., Franklin, M.K., & Postler, K.B. (2021). Academic trajectories of college students with and without ADHD: Predictors of four-year outcomes. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. doi: 10.1080/15374416.2020.1867990

    He, J., & Antshel, K. (2017). Cognitive behavioral therapy for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in college students: A review of the literature. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 24, 152–173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpr...

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    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Socratic questioning is a transtheoretical omnipresent psychotherapeutic process. Effective use of Socratic questioning in session is predictive of symptoms change; this relationship holds even after controlling for the relationship. However, there is some evidence that learning to artfully and competently use Socratic strategies in session is among the hardest skills for a psychotherapist to learn. Of course, Socrates was not a therapist and a pure application of the Socratic Method with a perfect fidelity would not be therapeutic. This webinar presents a more empathic and collaborative approach to using Socratic strategies in a clinical context; Socratic strategies are integrated with good clinical practices in a manner that is consistent with the evidence-base of what constitutes effective therapy. This webinar presents a framework for teaching clients and therapists how to use Socratic cognitive and behavior change strategies. This framework is based on methods that have proven effective training several thousand frontline public mental health therapists in how to deliver high quality cognitive behavior therapy. Participants will be taught how to use a four-step framework for Socratic questioning. Collaborative empiricism appropriately describes this process of using collaborative strategies to join with the client in applying scientific curiosity to their thought processes. Participants will learn how to use Socratic questioning strategies both within a single session and consistently across a number of sessions to bring about change in patient schema (i.e., core beliefs). Webinar will focus on applied examples and demonstrations.

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    Original Air Date: March 11, 2022

    Abstract:

    Socratic questioning is a transtheoretical omnipresent psychotherapeutic process. Effective use of Socratic questioning in session is predictive of symptoms change; this relationship holds even after controlling for the relationship. However, there is some evidence that learning to artfully and competently use Socratic strategies in session is among the hardest skills for a psychotherapist to learn. Of course, Socrates was not a therapist and a pure application of the Socratic Method with a perfect fidelity would not be therapeutic. This webinar presents a more empathic and collaborative approach to using Socratic strategies in a clinical context; Socratic strategies are integrated with good clinical practices in a manner that is consistent with the evidence-base of what constitutes effective therapy. This webinar presents a framework for teaching clients and therapists how to use Socratic cognitive and behavior change strategies. This framework is based on methods that have proven effective training several thousand frontline public mental health therapists in how to deliver high quality cognitive behavior therapy. Participants will be taught how to use a four-step framework for Socratic questioning. Collaborative empiricism appropriately describes this process of using collaborative strategies to join with the client in applying scientific curiosity to their thought processes. Participants will learn how to use Socratic questioning strategies both within a single session and consistently across a number of sessions to bring about change in patient schema (i.e., core beliefs). Webinar will focus on applied examples and demonstrations.

    About the Presenter:

    Scott H Waltman, PsyD, ABPP, is a clinician, international trainer, and practice-based researcher. His interests include evidence-based psychotherapy practice, training, and implementation in systems that provide care to underserved populations. He is certified as a qualified Cognitive Therapist and Trainer/Consultant by the Academy of Cognitive & Behavioral Therapies. He also is board certified in Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology. More recently, Dr. Waltman, worked as a CBT trainer for one of Dr. Aaron Beck’s CBT implementation teams in the Philadelphia public mental health system. Currently, he works as a clinical psychologist in private practice and a managed care system, where he is a frontline clinician and practice-based researcher. Clinically, Dr. Waltman strives to flexibly and compassionately apply cognitive and behavioral interventions to help people overcome the barriers in their lives, to facilitate building meaningful lives that are guided by passion and values.

    Learning Objectives

    Based on the content of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1.  Identify key cognitions and behaviors that are optimal targets of Socratic change strategies 2.  Use validation and perspective taking strategies to develop a better understanding of the target cognition and behavior 3.  Use collaborative empiricism and curiosity to create fuller and more balanced perspective 4.  Summarize and synthesize the Socratic dialogue to consolidate learning and create a focus on behavior change

    Recommended Readings

    Waltman, S. H., Codd, R. T., McFarr, L. M. & Moore. B. A. (2020). Socratic Questioning for Therapists and Counselors: Learn How to Think and Intervene like a Cognitive Behavior Therapist. New York: Routledge. 

    Waltman, S. H., Hall, B. C., McFarr, L. M., & Creed, T. A. (2018). Clinical case consultation and experiential learning in CBT implementation: Brief qualitative investigation. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 32(2), 112-126.

    Waltman, S. H., Sokol, L., & Beck, A. T. (2017). Cognitive behavior therapy treatment fidelity in clinical trials: Review of recommendations. Current Psychiatry Reviews, 13, 311-315.

    Waltman, S. H., Hall, B. C., McFarr, L. M., Beck, A. T., & Creed, T. A. (2017). In-session stuck points and pitfalls of community clinicians learning CBT: Qualitative investigation. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 24, 256-267.

    Waltman, S. H., Creed, T. A., & Beck, A. T. (2016). Are the effects of cognitive behavior therapy for depression falling? Review and critique of the evidence. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 23(2), 113-122.

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    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0657.

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Disruptive behavior in children is the most common source of referral to mental health providers, yet many clinicians do not know how to treat these problems. This webinar will cover the core parenting skills that compose most evidence-based behavioral parent training interventions for disruptive behavior in children. We will go over why children misbehave and how parents often inadvertently reinforce misbehavior. More importantly, we will cover the most important skills that are taught across all of the best researched parent training interventions, with a particular focus on the controversial skill of Time Out. Attendees will leave knowing how to teach parents some of these core skills as well as how to attain the next steps in knowledge and training.

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    Original Air Date: March 4, 2022

    Abstract:

    Disruptive behavior in children is the most common source of referral to mental health providers, yet many clinicians do not know how to treat these problems. This webinar will cover the core parenting skills that compose most evidence-based behavioral parent training interventions for disruptive behavior in children. We will go over why children misbehave and how parents often inadvertently reinforce misbehavior. More importantly, we will cover the most important skills that are taught across all of the best researched parent training interventions, with a particular focus on the controversial skill of Time Out. Attendees will leave knowing how to teach parents some of these core skills as well as how to attain the next steps in knowledge and training.

    About the Presenter:

    Director of Clinical Training and Associate Professor of psychology at LIU-Post in Long Island, New York, Dr. Ortiz specializes in parenting, disruptive behavior problems in children, bedtime resistance, elimination disorders, and cognitive behavior therapy for child and adult psychiatric disorders. Dr. Ortiz received a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1999 and completed a pre-doctoral internship at Montefiore Medical Center and a postdoctoral research fellowship at Stony Brook before joining the faculty at LIU-Post in 2001. He teaches the full year statistics sequence in the doctoral program in clinical psychology as well as clinical classes that focus on cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) and evidence-based treatment of children and adolescents. Dr. Ortiz is a licensed psychologist in New York State and sees clients privately.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1)    Attendees will be able to describe the parent-child coercive behavior cycle 

    2)    Attendees will be able to identify the core skills that form most evidence-based parent training interventions 

    3)    Attendees will be able to demonstrate several parent training skills, including Time Out

    Recommended Readings

    Dodge, K. A., & Pettit, G. S. (2003). A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence. Developmental psychology, 39(2), 349.           

    Kaminski, J. W. & Claussen, A. H. (2017) Evidence base update for psychosocial treatments for disruptive behaviors in children, Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology,  46(4), 477-499, DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2017.1310044

    Dadds, M. R., & Tully, L. A. (2019). What is it to discipline a child: What should it be? A reanalysis of time-out from the perspective of child mental health, attachment, and trauma. American Psychologist, 74(7), 794.

    Ortiz, C. & Del Vecchio, T. (2013). Cultural diversity: Do we need a new wake-up call for parent training? Behavior Therapy, 44, 443-458.

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    About the Moderator: Dr. Laurie Zandberg, PsyD is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. Her work focuses on the implementation of exposure based therapies for anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post traumatic stress disorder. 

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0657.

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Clients who identify as sexual and gender minorities seek therapy for many of the same reasons as heterosexual and/or cisgender clients including anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and relationship problems. Typical evidence-based interventions are likely to be effective, but best practice demands clinicians consider the cultural context when implementing a treatment plan. Despite progress in recent years, sexual and gender minorities continue to face structural inequities and marginalization in their daily lives that are exacerbated if they also hold other minoritized identities. Even with the best intentions, bias can intrude into the therapy room. This clinically-focused webinar will emphasize incorporating sexual and gender identities into the case conceptualization and adapting common CBT interventions such as cognitive restructuring, exposure, and behavioral activation to meet the needs of clients. Considerations for practice such as creating an affirming environment and engagement with LGBTQA+ communities will also be discussed.

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    Original Air Date: February 18, 2022

    Abstract:

    Clients who identify as sexual and gender minorities seek therapy for many of the same reasons as heterosexual and/or cisgender clients including anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and relationship problems.  Typical evidence-based interventions are likely to be effective, but best practice demands clinicians consider the cultural context when implementing a treatment plan.  Despite progress in recent years, sexual and gender minorities continue to face structural inequities and marginalization in their daily lives that are exacerbated if they also hold other minoritized identities.  Even with the best intentions, bias can intrude into the therapy room. This clinically-focused webinar will emphasize incorporating sexual and gender identities into the case conceptualization and adapting common CBT interventions such as cognitive restructuring, exposure, and behavioral activation to meet the needs of clients.  Considerations for practice such as creating an affirming environment and engagement with LGBTQA+ communities will also be discussed.  

    About the Presenter:

    Debra A. Hope received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University at Albany-State University of New York in 1990 and joined the Department of Psychology at University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the same year.  At present, she is Aaron Douglas Professor, Associate Vice Chancellor and Dean of Graduate Education. Her current research interests focus on two primary areas: (a) mental health impacts of stigma and discrimination, particularly for gender and sexual minorities, and (b) anxiety disorders with a focus on social anxiety disorder. Dr. Hope has published over 130 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and books, including Managing Social Anxiety: A Cognitive Behavioral Approach therapist guide and client workbook with Richard Heimberg and Cynthia Turk in the Oxford University Press Treatments That Work series.  She is co-founder of Trans Collaborations (go.unl.edu/transcollaborations), a community-based research partnership to address health disparities for transgender and gender diverse adults in underserved areas. Dr. Hope is the director of the Rainbow Clinic, one of the specialty services within the UNL Psychological Consultation Center.  She has over three decades of experience in clinical training and her own clinical practice. Dr. Hope is a Fellow and past president of ABCT.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, participants will:

        a.  understand how contemporary cultural context impacts the health and well-being of sexual and gender minorities.     b.  be able to incorporate sexual and gender minority identities into CBT case conceptualization.     c.  know how to adapt common CBT interventions to be sensitive to the cultural context of their LBGTQA+ clients.     d.  understand how to incorporate clients’ strengths and challenges in the context of all of their intersecting identities.

    Recommended Readings

    Hope, D.A., Holt, N. R., Woodruff, N., Mocarski, R., Meyer, H. Puckett, J. A., Eyer, J., Craig, S., Feldman, J., Irwin, J., Pachankis, J., Rawson, K.J., Sevelius, J., Butler, S. (in press). Bridging the gap between practice guidelines and the therapy room: Community-derived adaptations for psychological services with transgender and gender diverse adults in the Central United States.  Professional Psychology: Science and Practice

    Pachankis, J.E., & Safren, S. A. (2019).  Handbook of Evidence-Based Mental Health Practice with Sexual and Gender Minorities.  Oxford University Press.

    Puckett, J. A., Barr, S. M., Wadsworth, L. P., Thai, J. (2018). Considerations for clinical work and research with transgender and gender diverse individuals. the Behavior Therapist, 41, 253-262.

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    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0657.

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Process-based therapy (PBT) is a radical departure from the latent disease model of the DSM and ICD with its absurd proliferation of the protocols-for-syndrome approach.

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    Original Air Date: December 10, 2021

    Abstract:

    Process-based therapy (PBT) is a radical departure from the latent disease model of the DSM and ICD with its absurd proliferation of the protocols-for-syndrome approach. Instead, PBT focuses on how to best target and change core biopsychosocial processes in a specific situation for given goals with a given client. This approach recognizes that psychotherapy typically involves non-linear (rather than linear), bidirectional (rather than unidirectional), and dynamic changes of many (rather than only a few) interconnected variables. Effective therapy changes the entire system toward a stable and adaptive state by enhancing context-specific variability, selection and retention of biopsychosocial processes. PBT is, therefore, grounded in evolutionary science. For therapy to be most effective, we, therefore, need to embrace a systematic, assessment-guided, and theory-based approach to understand the relationships of the various problems of a given client. Functional analysis, the foundation of behavior therapy, provides the basis to understand these relationships. PBT acknowledges the complexity, inter-relatedness, and multidimensional levels of the problems in a given client. This workshop will illustrate how PBT is used to target key treatment processes by combining functional analysis with a dynamic and person-specific network approach.

    About the Presenter:

    Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is the Alexander von Humboldt Professor at the Department of Clinical Psychology at the Philipps-University Marburg and professor of psychology at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, where he directs the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. He has an actively funded research program studying various aspects of emotional disorders with a particular emphasis on anxiety disorders and cognitive behavioral therapy. He has won many prestigious professional awards, including the Aaron T. Beck Award for Significant and Enduring Contributions to the Field of Cognitive Therapy by the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He is a fellow of the APA, APS, ABCT, and was president of various national and international professional societies, including the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy. He was also an advisor to the DSM-5 Development Process and a member of the DSM-5 Anxiety Disorder Sub-Work Group. Dr. Hofmann has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters. He is currently editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research and associate editor of Clinical Psychological Science. He has published more than 400 peer-reviewed journal articles and 20 books, For more information, visit http://www.bostonanxiety.org/

    Learning Objectives

    This webinar is designed to help participants:

    1. Appreciating the limitations and weaknesses of the contemporary medical model.
    2. Gaining an up-to-date understanding of the core processes of CBT.
    3. Developing an idiographic, functional diagnostic system based on evolutionary science.
    4. Establishing more progressive models and theories in clinical practice.
    5. Using functional analysis in conjunction with complex network approach in a given client.

     

    Recommended Readings

    Hayes, S. C. & Hofmann, S. G. (Eds.) (2018). Process-based CBT: The science and core clinical competencies of cognitive behavioral therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications. ISBN-13: 978-1626255968.

    Hayes, S. C., Hofmann, S. G., & Wilson, D. S. (2020). Clinical psychology is an applied evolutionary science. Clinical Psychology Review, 81. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2020.101892

    Hofmann, S. G., & Hayes, S. C. (2019). The future of intervention science: Process-based therapy. Clinical Psychological Science, 7, 37–50. doi: 10.1177/2167702618772296

    Hofmann, S. G., Curtiss, J. E., & Hayes, S. C. (2020). Beyond linear mediation: Toward a dynamic network approach to study treatment processes. Clinical Psychology Review, 76, doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2020.101824

     

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    About the Moderator: Jessica Lipschitz, PhD earned her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Rhode Island. She is the Associate Director of the Digital Behavioral Health & Informatics Research Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Her research focuses on implementation and testing of digital behavioral health tools and she has specific clinical expertise in anxiety, depression, PTSD and couples therapy. Dr. Lipschitz has worked extensively with the VA on national digital health rollout initiatives and has consulted and conducted research in partnership with industry aimed at improving and implementing digital health solutions for behavioral health. She serves on the editorial board for Journal of Medical Internet Research – Mental Health.

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0657.

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this webinar, Dr. Natalia Skritskaya will describe a model of grief and adaptation to loss that is derived from clinical and experimental research. She will discuss the new diagnosis of Prolonged Grief Disorder and differentiating this condition from major depression and PTSD. She will also introduce Prolonged Grief Disorder Treatment, previously known as Complicated Grief Treatment, an evidence-based efficacious psychotherapy for prolonged grief disorder.

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    Original Air Date: October 8, 2021

    Abstract:

    In this webinar, Dr. Natalia Skritskaya will describe a model of grief and adaptation to loss that is derived from clinical and experimental research. She will discuss the new diagnosis of Prolonged Grief Disorder and differentiating this condition from major depression and PTSD. She will also introduce Prolonged Grief Disorder Treatment, previously known as Complicated Grief Treatment, an evidence-based efficacious psychotherapy for prolonged grief disorder.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Skritskaya is a researcher at the Center for Complicated Grief, Columbia University and clinical psychologist in private practice. Her background is in cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders with an interest in mind-body connection. For the past decade Dr. Skritskaya has been helping people struggling with difficult losses and also trained clinicians in an evidence-based prolonged grief therapy. Her research is focused on assessment of typical bereavement-related thoughts and understanding their role in prolonged grief.

    Learning Objectives

    This webinar is designed to help participants:

    1. Recognize main features of Prolonged Grief Disorder.
    2. Describe how grief is different from depression or PTSD.
    3. List core procedures of Prolonged Grief Disorder Treatment.

    Recommended Readings:

    Shear, M. K., & Bloom, C. G. (2017). Complicated grief treatment: An evidence-based approach to grief therapy. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 35(1), 6-25.

    Shear, K., Frank, E., Houck, P. R., & Reynolds, C. F. (2005). Treatment of complicated grief: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 293(21), 2601-2608.

    Shear, M. K., Reynolds, C. F., Simon, N. M., Zisook, S., Wang, Y., Mauro, C., ... & Skritskaya, N. (2016). Optimizing treatment of complicated grief: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA psychiatry, 73(7), 685-694.


    Shear, K., Monk, T., Houck, P., Melhem, N., Frank, E., Reynolds, C., & Sillowash, R. (2007). An attachment-based model of complicated grief including the role of avoidance. European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience, 257(8), 453-461.


    Skritskaya, N. A., Mauro, C., Garcia de la Garza, A., Meichsner, F., Lebowitz, B., Reynolds, C. F., ... & Shear, M. K. (2020). Changes in typical beliefs in response to complicated grief treatment. Depression and anxiety, 37(1), 81-89.

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    About the Moderator: James F. Boswell, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University at Albany SUNY, and an Associate of the Center for the Elimination of Minority Health Disparities. His research focuses on the processes and outcomes of psychological interventions and science-practice integration, including measurement-based care and harnessing practice-based evidence.

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0657.