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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/21/2023 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder seen by primary care and GI physicians, accounts for considerable personal suffering, and is largely refractory to medical therapies. Its physical symptoms (pain, diarrhea and/or constipation) commonly co-occur with other psychological complaints (e. g. GAD, depression) that behavior therapists effectively treat and thus offer a gratifying way of expanding one’s clinical practice. In the absence of any organic cause, IBS is best understood from a biopsychosocial perspective (Van Oudenhove et al., 2016, Gastroenterology) that emphasizes the reciprocal and interactive relationship among a person’s biology (e. g., GI motility, pain sensitivity, stress reactivity), behaviors (e. g., avoidance), and higher order central processes (rigid cognitive style characterized by perseverative thought manifested in restricted coping and perceptual biases to threat) that influence GI symptoms. Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of CBT for IBS have established it as a gold standard psychological treatment, yielding dramatic, rapid, broad, and sustained symptom improvement that compares favorably to pharmacological or dietary treatments (Mayer, 2007, New England Journal of Medicine). After a brief overview of IBS, this workshop will describe the conceptual underpinnings of CBT for IBS, its rationale, goals and technical components using didactic instruction and detailed case examples from actual patients enrolled in a landmark NIH trial (Lackner, Jaccard, et al., Gastroenterology, 2018) that affirmed CBT’s status as the most widely endorsed empirically validated psychological treatment (Black. et al., GUT, 2020) and arguably the most effective behavioral treatment for any chronic pain disorder. Attendees will learn practical strategies to trouble shoot around difficult clinical issues to maximize outcome, patient engagement, and clinician satisfaction.

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    Friday, July 21, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder seen by primary care and GI physicians, accounts for considerable personal suffering, and is largely refractory to medical therapies. Its physical symptoms (pain, diarrhea and/or constipation) commonly co-occur with other psychological complaints (e. g. GAD, depression) that behavior therapists effectively treat and thus offer a gratifying way of expanding one’s clinical practice. In the absence of any organic cause, IBS is best understood from a biopsychosocial perspective (Van Oudenhove et al., 2016, Gastroenterology) that emphasizes the reciprocal and interactive relationship among a person’s biology (e. g., GI motility, pain sensitivity, stress reactivity), behaviors (e. g., avoidance), and higher order central processes (rigid cognitive style characterized by perseverative thought manifested in restricted coping and perceptual biases to threat) that influence GI symptoms. Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of CBT for IBS have established it as a gold standard psychological treatment, yielding dramatic, rapid, broad, and sustained symptom improvement that compares favorably to pharmacological or dietary treatments (Mayer, 2007, New England Journal of Medicine). After a brief overview of IBS, this workshop will describe the conceptual underpinnings of CBT for IBS, its rationale, goals and technical components using didactic instruction and detailed case examples from actual patients enrolled in a landmark NIH trial (Lackner, Jaccard, et al., Gastroenterology, 2018) that affirmed CBT’s status as the most widely endorsed empirically validated psychological treatment (Black. et al., GUT, 2020) and arguably the most effective behavioral treatment for any chronic pain disorder.  Attendees will learn practical strategies to trouble shoot around difficult clinical issues to maximize outcome, patient engagement, and clinician satisfaction. 

    About the Presenter:

    Jeff Lackner is a clinical psychologist who studies biobehavioral aspects of persistent painful disease at the University at Buffalo (UB). He received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers and completed internship at the University of Texas School of Medicine (Houston).  After completing a fellowship in Behavioral Medicine at the University of Rochester, he joined the faculty at UB.  As Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Behavioral Medicine at the UB Jacobs School of Medicine, he oversees a division whose clinical, research, and educational activities focus on the interplay of medicine and behavior on health outcomes with a primary focus on this related to chronic pain. Since its founding in 1994, the division’s clinical arm has provided state-of-the-art behavioral treatments for chronic pain disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), back pain, pelvic pain, fibromyalgia, non-cardiac chest pain, jaw pain, and benign headaches. With NIH support since 1999, his work has informed clinical practice guidelines in the US, Europe, and Asia, earning him fellowship status in the American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, Society of Behavioral Medicine, Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research and American Gastroenterological Association.  In addition to cutting-edge research, Dr Lackner maintains an active clinic practice, teaches, and mentors undergraduates, pre and postdoctoral trainees, medical students, fellows, and junior physician-scientists.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, the learner will be able to:

    1. Understand the nature and symptoms of IBS as well as its economic and personal burden
    2. Understand the conceptual basis for CBT for IBS with a focus on actionable transdiagnostic processes that maintain core gastrointestinal symptoms
    3. Learn how to implement core CBT techniques to improve IBS symptoms and quality of life
    4. Learn the role of non-specific factors, which ones are most strongly related to positive outcome, and how to use them to optimize outcome 


    Recommended Readings

    Van Oudenhove L, Crowell MD, Drossman DA, Halpert AD, Keefer L, Lackner JM, Murphy TB, Naliboff BD, Levy RL. Biopsychosocial Aspects of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Gastroenterology. 2016 Feb 18:S0016-5085(16)00218-3..

    Lackner, J. M., et al. (2018). "Improvement in Gastrointestinal Symptoms After Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Refractory Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Gastroenterology 155(1): 47-57.

    Radziwon, C. and J. M. Lackner (2015). "Coping Flexibility, GI Symptoms, and Functional GI Disorders: How Translational Behavioral Medicine Research Can Inform GI Practice." Clin Transl Gastroenterol 6: e117.

    Black, C. J., et al. (2020). "Efficacy of psychological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and network meta-analysis." Gut 69(8): 1441-1451

    Lackner, J. M. (2020). "Skills over pills? A clinical gastroenterologist's primer in cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome." Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 14(7): 601-618.

    About the Moderator: Dr. Laurie Zandberg, PsyD is an anxiety and exposure therapy specialist serving residents of PA and PSYPACT participating states via telehealth. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. Her research collaborations have focused on identifying mechanisms of change and improving access to evidence based treatments for eating disorders, OCD, and PTSD.  

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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 04/27/2023 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    The discrepancy between need and access to mental health services is uncontestable. An estimated 57% to 67% of adults experiencing mental illness in the United States do not receive needed services. The need-to-access gap is even wider for children and adolescents: Up to 80% of youths with mental health needs go without services each year. Even among those who do access care, treatment is often brief: international service-use data suggests that the modal number of sessions attended is just one. This creates a need to quantify and capitalize on what can be accomplished therapeutically, given appropriate targeting and structure, in a short period of time. Therefore, this talk will outline recent innovations in single-session interventions (SSIs) for mental health problems, including the evidence supporting their effects; how they might yield clinically-meaningful change; resources for delivering evidence-based SSIs; and where, when, and how they can be delivered. Understanding SSIs’ promise creates an opportunity for a paradigm shift in our field’s thinking about constructing services for broad-scale impact. SSIs can operate as stand-alone services or as adjunctive services within existing care systems; as such, learning to study and provide SSIs may improve the reach of effective mental health interventions while mitigating problems linked to long waiting lists, global provider shortages, and high costs of traditional care.


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    Thursday, April 27, 2023

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    The discrepancy between need and access to mental health services is uncontestable. An estimated 57% to 67% of adults experiencing mental illness in the United States do not receive needed services. The need-to-access gap is even wider for children and adolescents: Up to 80% of youths with mental health needs go without services each year. Even among those who do access care, treatment is often brief: international service-use data suggests that the modal number of sessions attended is just one. This creates a need to quantify and capitalize on what can be accomplished therapeutically, given appropriate targeting and structure, in a short period of time. Therefore, this talk will outline recent innovations in single-session interventions (SSIs) for mental health problems, including the evidence supporting their effects; how they might yield clinically-meaningful change; resources for delivering evidence-based SSIs; and where, when, and how they can be delivered. Understanding SSIs’ promise creates an opportunity for a paradigm shift in our field’s thinking about constructing services for broad-scale impact. SSIs can operate as stand-alone services or as adjunctive services within existing care systems; as such, learning to study and provide SSIs may improve the reach of effective mental health interventions while mitigating problems linked to long waiting lists, global provider shortages, and high costs of traditional care.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Jessica L. Schleider (she/her/hers) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University (SUNY), where she founded and directs the Lab for Scalable Mental Health.  She completed her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Harvard University in 2018, along with a Doctoral Internship in Clinical and Community Psychology at Yale School of Medicine. In support of her research on brief, scalable interventions for depression and anxiety in young people, she has secured >$6 million in federal (NIH, NSF, HRSA), foundation, and industry grant funding as PI, MPI, or Co-I. Dr. Schleider been recognized via numerous awards, including the NIH Director's Early Independence Award; the ABCT President's New Researcher Award; the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology's Susan Nolen-Hoeksema Early Career Research Award; the SCCAP Abidin Early Career Award; and in 2020, she was selected as one of Forbes' 30 Under 30 in Healthcare. Dr. Schleider has published >80 scientific articles and book chapters and created or co-created six open-access, single-session mental health programs, which have served >15,000 teens and adults to date. Based on these programs, Dr. Schleider and her colleagues wrote a self-help workbook, The Growth Mindset Workbook for Teens (New Harbinger); she also co-edited the Oxford Guide to Brief and Low-Intensity Interventions for Children and Young People (Oxford University Press) and is writing a nonfiction book (Little, Brown Book Group) on how single-session interventions and meaningful moments can transform mental health.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1. Participants will be able to describe advances in research on single-session interventions (SSIs) for youth mental health problems, including characteristics of effective SSIs that have shown positive effects.
    2. Participants will be able to identify and implement components of evidence-based SSIs that can improve mental health and coping in youths and adults.
    3. Participants will learn strategies for evaluating the effectiveness of SSIs implemented in clinical and/or research settings. 

    Recommended Readings

    • Schleider, J. L., Mullarkey, M.C., Fox, K.R., Dobias, M.L., Shroff, A., Hart, E.A., Roulston, C. (2022). A Randomized Trial of Online Single-Session Interventions for Adolescent Depression during COVID-19. Nature Human Behaviour, 6, 258-268.
    • Schleider, J. L., Dobias, M. L., Sung, J. Y., & Mullarkey, M. C. (2020). Future directions in single-session youth mental health interventions. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 2, 264-278.
    • Schleider, J. L., Dobias, M. L., Mullarkey, M. C., & Ollendick, T. (2021). Retiring, Rethinking, and Reconstructing the Norm of Once-Weekly Psychotherapy. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 48, 4-8. 
    • Schleider, J. L., Sung, J. Y., Bianco, A., Gonzalez, A., Vivian, D., & *Mullarkey, M. C. (2021). Open pilot trial of a single-session consultation service for clients on psychotherapy waitlists. The Behavior Therapist, 44, 8-15. Preprint  
    • Osborn, T. L., Rodriguez, M., Wasil, A. R., Venturo-Conerly, K. E., Gan, J., Alemu, R. G., ... & Weisz, J. R. (2020). Single-session digital intervention for adolescent depression, anxiety, and well-being: Outcomes of a randomized controlled trial with Kenyan adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology88(7), 657-668.
    • Bertuzzi, V., Fratini, G., Tarquinio, C., Cannistrà, F., Granese, V., Giusti, E. M., ... & Pietrabissa, G. (2021). Single-Session Therapy by Appointment for the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Youth and Adults: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Frontiers in Psychology12, 721382.

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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/02/2023 at 11:00 AM (EST)

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU), a negative dispositional characteristic that results from catastrophic beliefs about uncertainty, is a key vulnerability factor for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Research has shown that IU is highly related to the symptoms of GAD, that the relationship between IU and GAD is not accounted for by other vulnerability factors, and that changes in IU precede and predict corresponding changes in the symptoms of GAD. In this webinar, I will present a new, highly focused treatment for GAD: Behavioural Experiments for Intolerance of Uncertainty. The treatment draws upon 30 years of research on the role of intolerance of uncertainty in GAD, as well as on recent theorizing on the mechanisms of fear reduction. In brief, the new treatment uses the structure of behavioural experiments to explicitly test client hypotheses and thus enhance new learning during exposure to uncertainty. The treatment has now been tested in two clinical trials, with results showing that it promotes impressive change in negative beliefs about uncertainty, the symptoms of GAD and general psychopathology. The goal of this workshop is to present the new treatment’s underlying theory and to illustrate its strategies and procedures.

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    Thursday, March 2, 2023

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU), a negative dispositional characteristic that results from catastrophic beliefs about uncertainty, is a key vulnerability factor for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Research has shown that IU is highly related to the symptoms of GAD, that the relationship between IU and GAD is not accounted for by other vulnerability factors, and that changes in IU precede and predict corresponding changes in the symptoms of GAD. In this webinar, I will present a new, highly focused treatment for GAD: Behavioural Experiments for Intolerance of Uncertainty. The treatment draws upon 30 years of research on the role of intolerance of uncertainty in GAD, as well as on recent theorizing on the mechanisms of fear reduction. In brief, the new treatment uses the structure of behavioural experiments to explicitly test client hypotheses and thus enhance new learning during exposure to uncertainty. The treatment has now been tested in two clinical trials, with results showing that it promotes impressive change in negative beliefs about uncertainty, the symptoms of GAD and general psychopathology. The goal of this workshop is to present the new treatment’s underlying theory and to illustrate its strategies and procedures.

    Presenter Biography:

    Dr. Michel Dugas is Professor of Psychology at the University of Quebec in Outaouais, Quebec, Canada. Over the past 30 years, he has conducted research on the role of intolerance of uncertainty in the aetiology and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). His research program has led to the development and validation of cognitive-behavioural treatments for GAD that are now being used in numerous countries. He has published over 110 peer-reviewed articles, made over 300 scientific conference presentations, and given numerous clinical workshops around the world. Dr. Dugas is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and the Canadian Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies. In 2017, he received the Donald O. Hebb Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology as a Science from the Canadian Psychological Association.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To become familiar with the literature on intolerance of uncertainty and GAD.

    2. To clearly understand the treatment’s underlying model and how the model relates to general cognitive-behavioural theory.

    3. To learn how to adjust one’s therapeutic attitudes to promote exposure to uncertainty in session.

    4. To learn how to use behavioural experiments to promote new learning about uncertainty and its sequelae. 

    Recommended Readings:

    1. Dugas, M. J., Sexton, K. A., Hebert, E. A., Bouchard, S., Gouin, J.-P., & Shafran, R. (2022-10). Behavioral experiments for intolerance of uncertainty: A randomized clinical trial for adults with generalized anxiety disorder. Behavior Therapy, 53(6), 1147-1160. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2022.05.003

    2. Hebert, E. A., & Dugas, M. J. (2019). Behavioral experiments for intolerance of uncertainty: Challenging the unknown in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 26(2), 421-436. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2018.07.007

    3. Robichaud, M., Koerner, N., & Dugas, M. J. (2019). Cognitive-behavioral treatment for generalized anxiety disorder: From science to practice (Second edition). New York, NY: Routledge.


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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124





  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 02/24/2023 at 11:00 AM (EST)

    Alcohol use behavior is broadly associated with romantic relationship functioning. Problems with alcohol use may strain romantic relationships and relationship conflict may trigger alcohol use. On the other hand, supportive partners and well-functioning relationships are associated with improved treatment outcomes for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) is designed to treat individual alcohol use problems by addressing the interpersonal patterns that maintain drinking while enhancing relationship functioning. This webinar will explore the role of romantic partners in alcohol use treatment and provide an overview of ABCT techniques.

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    Friday, February 24, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Alcohol use behavior is broadly associated with romantic relationship functioning. Problems with alcohol use may strain romantic relationships and relationship conflict may trigger alcohol use. On the other hand, supportive partners and well-functioning relationships are associated with improved treatment outcomes for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) is designed to treat individual alcohol use problems by addressing the interpersonal patterns that maintain drinking while enhancing relationship functioning. This webinar will explore the role of romantic partners in alcohol use treatment and provide an overview of ABCT techniques.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Jasara Hogan is a clinical psychologist and Research Assistant Scientist with the Family Translational Research Group at New York University. She completed her doctoral training at the University of Utah where she studied the etiology and treatment of romantic relationship distress with an emphasis on the efficacy of Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT). During internship at the Charleston Consortium, Dr. Hogan transitioned her research to understanding the role of romantic relationship functioning in the etiology, course, and treatment of individual Alcohol Use Disorder and binge drinking behavior. Prior to joining FTRG, Dr. Hogan was a Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) scholar and Research Assistant professor at the Medical University of South Carolina in the Addiction Sciences Division.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, the learner will be able to:

      1. Recognize the role of romantic relationships in the course and treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD)
      2. Apply dyadic case conceptualizations to the treatment of individual AUD 
      3. Summarize basic techniques used in ABCT

    Recommended Readings

    McCrady, B. S., & Epstein, E. E. (2010). Overcoming alcohol problems: A couples-focused program. Oxford University Press.

    McCrady, B. S., Tonigan, J. S., Ladd, B. O., Hallgren, K. A., Pearson, M. R., Owens, M. D., & Epstein, E. E. (2019). Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy: In-session behavior, active ingredients and mechanisms of behavior change. Journal of substance abuse treatment99, 139-148.

    McCrady, B. S., & Flanagan, J. C. (2021). The role of the family in alcohol use disorder recovery for adults. Alcohol Research: Current Reviews41(1).

    *************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/01/2022

    Although regret is a central element in depression, procrastination, indecision, self-criticism, worry, rumination, and avoidance, it has received little attention in the CBT literature. In contrast, regret has been a focus in decision theory and research indicating that when people make decisions, they often anticipate the possibility of post-decision regret and, therefore, attempt to minimize this experience. Regret is not always a negative process. Insufficient regret processes result in impulsive behavior and failure to learn from past decisions. During manic episodes there is underutilization of anticipatory regret. We will view regret as a self-regulatory process where too much regret or too little regret may be problematic. In addition, some decision makers have idealized beliefs about decisions, rejecting ambivalence as an inevitable part of the trade-offs underlying decision-making under uncertainty. Specific decision styles are more likely to contribute to regret, including maximization, emotional perfectionism, existential perfectionism, intolerance of uncertainty, and overvaluation of "more" information rather than relevant information. In this presentation we will examine how regret is linked to hindsight bias, maximization rather than satisfaction strategies, intolerance of uncertainty, rejection of ambivalence, refusal to accept trade-offs, excessive information demands, and ruminative processes. Specific techniques will be elaborated to balance regret with acceptance, future utility, and flexibility to enhance more pragmatic decision processes, reverse ruminative focus on the past, and replace self-criticism with adaptive self-correction.


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    Thursday, December 1, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Although regret is a central element in depression, procrastination, indecision, self-criticism, worry, rumination, and avoidance, it has received little attention in the CBT literature. In contrast, regret has been a focus in decision theory and research indicating that when people make decisions, they often anticipate the possibility of post-decision regret and, therefore, attempt to minimize this experience. Regret is not always a negative process. Insufficient regret processes result in impulsive behavior and failure to learn from past decisions. During manic episodes there is underutilization of anticipatory regret. We will view regret as a self-regulatory process where too much regret or too little regret may be problematic. In addition, some decision makers have idealized beliefs about decisions, rejecting ambivalence as an inevitable part of the trade-offs underlying decision-making under uncertainty. Specific decision styles are more likely to contribute to regret, including maximization, emotional perfectionism, existential perfectionism, intolerance of uncertainty, and overvaluation of "more" information rather than relevant information. In this presentation we will examine how regret is linked to hindsight bias, maximization rather than satisfaction strategies, intolerance of uncertainty, rejection of ambivalence, refusal to accept trade-offs, excessive information demands, and ruminative processes. Specific techniques will be elaborated to balance regret with acceptance, future utility, and flexibility to enhance more pragmatic decision processes, reverse ruminative focus on the past, and replace self-criticism with adaptive self-correction. 

    About the Presenter:

    Robert L. Leahy was educated at Yale University (BA,MS,MPHIL, PHD) and is the Founder and Director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in NYC, Clinical Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, and Past-President of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, The Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and The International Association of Cognitive Therapy. He is the recipient of the Aaron T. Beck Award for outstanding contributions in CBT. Leahy is the author of 29 books and is a frequent keynote speaker and presenter of workshops worldwide. His new book is If Only...Finding Freedom from Regret, published by Guilford Books.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, the learner will be able to:

    1. Identify the role of anticipatory and retrospective regret in decision making;
    2. Describe how regret impacts procrastination, risk aversion, indecision, rumination, and self-criticism;
    3. Explain how to assist clients in accepting uncertainty and risk in order to make more pragmatic and effective decisions;
    4. Describe how to assist clients in reducing post-decision regret, self-criticism and rumination and accept trade-offs in making decisions while enhancing satisfaction with imperfect outcomes.

    Recommended Readings

    Bell, D.E. (1982). Regret in decision making under uncertainty. Operations Research, 30, 961-981. 

    Leahy, R.L. (2022) If Only…Finding Freedom From Regret. New York: Guilford.

    Leahy, R.L. (2015). Emotional Schema Therapy: A practitioner's guide. New York: Guilford.

    Leahy, R.L. (2017). Cognitive therapy techniques (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford.

    Roese, N. J., & Summerville, A. (2005). What we regret most … and why. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin , 31, 1273–1285. doi:10.1177/0146167205274693.

    Zeelenberg, M., & Pieters, R. (2007). A Theory of Regret Regulation. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 17(1), 3–18.

    Zeelenberg, M., van den Bos, K., van Dijk, E., & Pieters, R. (2002). The Inaction Effect in the Psychology of Regret. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(3), 314–327.


    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

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    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 10 Component(s)

    Recordings from the ABCT 2022 Convention in NYC, including Invited Addresses, Invited Panels, and the Presidential Address and the Charles Silverstein Lifetime Achievement Social Justice Award.

    Recordings from the ABCT 2022 Convention in NYC, including Invited Addresses, Invited Panels, and the Presidential Address.

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Dr. Persons will define measurement-based care, describe reasons for providing MBC, offer hypotheses about why MBC might lead to improved client outcome, and describe steps to take to provide MBC, with many clinical examples and tools that learners can use to implement MBC. This webinar is ideal for private practitioners but is useful to therapists who provide CBT to adults in any outpatient setting.


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    October 28, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Dr. Persons will define measurement-based care, describe reasons for providing MBC, offer hypotheses about why MBC might lead to improved client outcome, and describe steps to take to provide MBC, with many clinical examples and tools that learners can use to implement MBC. This webinar is ideal for private practitioners but is useful to therapists who provide CBT to adults in any outpatient setting. 

    About the Presenter:

    Jacqueline B. Persons is Director of the Oakland Cognitive Behavior Therapy Center, and Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. She is internationally recognized for her writings on case conceptualization and evidence-based practice. Dr. Persons’ most recent book, The Case Formulation Approach to Cognitive Behavior Therapy, integrates measurement-based care into case formulation-driven treatment. Dr. Persons has presented dozens of training workshops around the world on the case formulation approach to CBT. She has published nearly 100 articles and chapters and three books. Dr. Persons is a past president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1979.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, the learner will be able to:

    1. List 3 reasons to provide measurement-based care;
    2. List 2 ways measurement-based care might improve client treatment outcome;
    3. Identify the essential quality of the therapist's stance when providing measurement-based care;
    4. Identify 3 tools and scales therapists can use to measure their clients' progress in therapy.

    Recommended Readings

    Lambert, M. J., & Shimokawa, K. (2011). Collecting client feedback. Psychotherapy, 48(1), 72–79. https://doi.org/10.1037/a00222...

    Persons, J. B., Beckner, V. L., & Tompkins, M. A. (2013). Testing case formulation hypotheses in psychotherapy: Two case examples. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 20(4), 399–409.

    Scott, K., & Lewis, C. C. (2015). Using measurement-based care to enhance any treatment. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 22(1), 49–59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpr...

    Jacqueline B. Persons, Ph.D. interviews Michael J. Lambert about his research in monitoring clients' progress in therapy for the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology here: http://www.sscpweb.org/page-18150

    About the Moderator: 

    Dr. Laurie Zandberg, PsyD is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. Her teaching and clinical work focuses on exposure based therapies for anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and related disorders. 

    *************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/22/2022

    The idea that people can be lastingly harmed by their own transgressive behavior and can suffer because of others’ moral failures is as old as humanity, yet these age-old concepts have only recently been considered as clinically relevant social, biological, spiritual, and psychological problems. Moral injury (MI) is the multidimensional outcome from exposure to transgressive harms that undermine foundational beliefs about the goodness and trustworthiness of oneself, others, or the world. Although moral injury has gained widespread acceptance, we have only just recently defined the syndrome and generated a method to measure the syndrome that can be used clinically. I will define the boundary conditions for MI and distinguish MI as a clinical problem in contrast to moral frustration and moral stress, describe the domains impacted by exposure to morally injurious events, provide an assessment tool that can be used clinically and in research, provide case conceptualization heuristics and treatment approaches that can be used when MI is the principal target (e.g., when a traumatic event is a MI) or when another presenting problem is colored by MI, and discuss process issues that arise when clinicians are confronted with the existential realities of grave transgressive behaviors or high stakes systemic failures.


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    Thursday, September 22, 2022

    2:00 pm- 3:30 pm Eastern/ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central/ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Mountain/ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    The idea that people can be lastingly harmed by their own transgressive behavior and can suffer because of others’ moral failures is as old as humanity, yet these age-old concepts have only recently been considered as clinically relevant social, biological, spiritual, and psychological problems. Moral injury (MI) is the multidimensional outcome from exposure to transgressive harms that undermine foundational beliefs about the goodness and trustworthiness of oneself, others, or the world. Although moral injury has gained widespread acceptance, we have only just recently defined the syndrome and generated a method to measure the syndrome that can be used clinically. I will define the boundary conditions for MI and distinguish MI as a clinical problem in contrast to moral frustration and moral stress, describe the domains impacted by exposure to morally injurious events, provide an assessment tool that can be used clinically and in research, provide case conceptualization heuristics and treatment approaches that can be used when MI is the principal target (e.g., when a traumatic event is a MI) or when another presenting problem is colored by MI, and discuss process issues that arise when clinicians are confronted with the existential realities of grave transgressive behaviors or high stakes systemic failures.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Litz is a clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. He is also the Director of the Mental Health Core of the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiological Research and Information Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Dr. Litz is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the American Psychopathological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1. Participants will learn to define moral injury
    2. Participants will be able to distinguish moral injury from moral frustration, moral distress, and PTSD
    3. Participants will learn how to assess the syndrome of moral injury and how to use a moral injury assessment instrument in practice
    4. Participants will learn about the phenomenology and the clinical needs of individuals with moral injury and ways of helping people to heal and repair moral injury

    Recommended Readings

    Litz, B. T., Stein, N., Delaney, E., Lebowitz, L., Nash, W. P., Silva, C., & Maguen, S. (2009). Moral injury and moral repair in war veterans: A preliminary model and intervention strategy. Clinical Psychology Review, 29, 695–706. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2009.07.003.

    Litz, B. T., & Kerig, P. K. (2019). Introduction to the special issue on moral injury: Conceptual challenges, methodological issues, and clinical applications. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 32(3), 341-349. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.22405.

    Litz, B., & Carney, J. R. (2018). Employing loving-kindness meditation to promote self-and other-compassion among war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. Spirituality in Clinical Practice5(3), 201. https://doi.org/10.1037/scp0000174.

    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

    *************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/16/2022

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death for all individuals in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 35 and 54 (CDC, 2018). Evidence based practice around suicide prevention and treatment can be difficult to understand and implement, causing tension between ethical standards of avoiding harm and practicing within areas of competency with day-to-day clinical obligations. This training seeks to find balance between resolving ethical tensions and increasing competencies regarding the treatment of suicidal patients. Participants will review up-to-date information on best practices for suicidal patients, practice interventions, and use working with suicidal clients as a lens from which discuss ethical codes related to practice.


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    September 16, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    $15 Student ABCT Members / $25 ABCT Members / $35 Non-Members

    Abstract:

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death for all individuals in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 35 and 54 (CDC, 2018). Evidence based practice around suicide prevention and treatment can be difficult to understand and implement, causing tension between ethical standards of avoiding harm and practicing within areas of competency with day-to-day clinical obligations. This training seeks to find balance between resolving ethical tensions and increasing competencies regarding the treatment of suicidal patients. Participants will review up-to-date information on best practices for suicidal patients, practice interventions, and use working with suicidal clients as a lens from which discuss ethical codes related to practice.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. White received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Rhode Island and was a fellow at Harvard Medical School before moving to Oregon, where he is a licensed psychologist. His clinical areas of expertise include suicide, clinical risk management, adolescent and family treatment, dialectical behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, and implementation of evidence-based practice. He has extensive research and evaluation experience on both coasts, with specific interests in community-based program evaluation, multilevel modeling, frequent use of psychiatric emergency services, and general evaluation of evidence-based practice. As an advocate of the scientist/practitioner model, he has a strongly held value and passion for the adherent delivery of effective evidence-based treatment, especially for individuals who have experienced barriers to accessing mental health services.

    In addition to clinical services, Dr. White trains internationally on suicide prevention and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and specializes in the implementation of DBT with non-dominant and native populations. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology within the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University, is board certified in DBT through the Linehan Board of Certification, holds ABPP Board Certification in Clinical and Behavioral Psychology, volunteers as a journal reviewer, and volunteers in multiple capacities for the Linehan Board of Certification.

    He is co-owner of the Portland DBT Institute (PDBTI) and serves as the Associate Director.  At PDBTI he works with the management team to set program policy, provides clinical services to adults, adolescents, and families, oversees research and evaluation services, and provides supervision to psychologist residents and clinical staff.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar:

    1. Participants will learn general long-term risk and protective factors for suicide
    2. Participants will learn times hospitalization is warranted for suicidal ideation   
    3. Participants will learn resources in the area to draw upon when working with suicidal patients

    Recommended Readings

    Ward-Ciesielski, E. F., & Rizvi, S. L. (2021). The potential iatrogenic effects of psychiatric hospitalization for suicidal behavior: A critical review and recommendations for research. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 28(1), 60.

    Franklin, J. C., Ribeiro, J. D., Fox, K. R., Bentley, K. H., Kleiman, E. M., Huang, X., ... & Nock, M. K. (2017). Risk factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviors: A meta-analysis of 50 years of research. Psychological bulletin, 143(2), 187.

    About the Moderator: Kyle Haney, PhD, is a Senior Staff Psychologist at *NYCBT* in New York City, as well as an educational consultant at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her clinical work focuses on providing CBT and DBT to adolescents and adults with specialized training in anxiety, Borderline Personality Disorder, and trauma treatments.

    *************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/24/2022

    Recorded June 24, 2022 - In recent years, the impact of stress due to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of identity-related discrimination has received greater attention at a national level. This presentation will discuss how to broach the topic of discrimination, provide practical strategies for assessment, and discuss tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions across multiple mental health conditions with cultural sensitivity.


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    June 24, 2022

    11:00 am- 12:30 pm Eastern/ 10:00 am – 11:30 am Central/ 9:00 am – 10:30 am Mountain/ 8:00 am – 9:30 am Pacific

    Abstract:

    In recent years, the impact of stress due to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of identity-related discrimination has received greater attention at a national level. This presentation will discuss how to broach the topic of discrimination, provide practical strategies for assessment, and discuss tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions across multiple mental health conditions with cultural sensitivity.

    About the Presenter:

    Dr. Brittany N. Hall-Clark is a Texas-licensed Clinical Psychologist. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hall-Clark completed a 2-year fellowship with STRONG STAR, a multidisciplinary PTSD research consortium. She then became an Assistant Professor within the Division of Behavioral Medicine and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. For 8 years, she worked at the Ft. Hood site of STRONG STAR as a cognitive-behavioral research therapist for several randomized clinical trials focused on PTSD and related conditions in active duty military personnel and veterans. She has been certified as a Master Prolonged Exposure clinician. Currently, she works with the STRONG STAR Training Initiative as a Prolonged Exposure therapy consultant. In addition, she is part of the National Center for PTSD Consultation team. Dr. Hall-Clark is passionate about diversity and cultural sensitivity, evidenced by her focus on cultural factors in treatment, provision of diversity training to graduate students and continuing education for professionals, and culturally-oriented publications and presentations. Her professional interests include translational research, cultural factors related to PTSD and other mental health issues, and racial trauma. Additional clinical specialties include trauma nightmares, insomnia, sleep, and anxiety.  Dr. Hall-Clark also practices privately at InSight Psychology and Behavioral Health Services in Pflugerville, TX.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of this webinar, participants will:

    1. Attendees will have increased awareness of how to broach the topic of discrimination with clients.  
    2. Incorporate culturally relevant measures into the assessment process. 
    3. Identify at least 3 specific strategies for tailoring cognitive and behavioral interventions with cultural sensitivity.  

    Recommended Readings

    Lee, E., Greenblatt, A., Hu, R., Johnstone, M., & Kourgiantakis, T. (2022, February 24). Microskills of Broaching and Bridging in Cross-Cultural Psychotherapy: Locating Therapy Skills in the Epistemic Domain Toward Fostering Epistemic Justice. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ort0...

    Williams, M.T., Haeny, A.M., and Holmes, S.C. (2021) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Racial Trauma (PDF) RQ Vol. 32(1)

    Williams, M. T., Printz, D. M. B., & DeLapp, R. C. T. (2018). Assessing racial trauma with the Trauma Symptoms of Discrimination Scale. Psychology of Violence8(6), 735–747. https://doi-org.libproxy.uthsc...

    About the Moderator: Lily Brown, PhD, is Director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research and clinical work focuses on the intersection of anxiety and suicide risk.

    *************************

    All attendees will receive a certificate of completion when the course requirements are satisfied. Certificates of completion is included in the cost of the webinar

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies incurs significant administrative cost related to your registration before a webinar.  Therefore, there are no refunds for live webinars. If you unable to attend a webinar, we will provide you with the recorded version after the live presentation (which is still eligible for CE credit). If you wish to cancel or request to transfer your webinar registration to another webinar please email your request to membership@abct.org

    ABCT is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. ABCT maintains responsibility for this program and its content

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5797. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies is recognized by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences for Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) to offer continuing education as Provider #4600

    Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0124