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Upcoming Live Webinars

  • Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/14/2024 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    Socrates was pronounced by the ancient Oracle as the wisest of his time. His philosophy was all about overcoming our ignorance and living a good life. From his teachings, many lines of philosophy were born. Ancient Stoicism was born out of Socratic wisdom. In the last decade there has been an explosion of interest in Stoicism worldwide. While ‘lowercase s’ stoicism conveys the idea of being unemotional or emotionally suppressed, ‘capital S’ Stoicism is a philosophy and ancient wisdom that dates back over 2000 years. Albert Ellis famously quoted the Roman philosopher Epictetus who said, “Men are not disturbed by things, but by their view of things.” Hundreds of years prior to Epictetus, Chrysippus wrote the first CBT book called On Emotions which detailed how our emotional reactions were influenced by our interpretations of situations (thoughts). There is a wealth of Stoic wisdom that CBT has yet to capitalize on. Notably, the goal of Stoicism is to tolerate discomfort and focus on living a good life that is in line with your values. In this way, Stoicism is actually more compatible with mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches like modern Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. This webinar will focus on the methods of Socrates (Socratic Questioning) and the lived philosophy that was born from his work (Stoicism). This talk is being offered as a fundraiser for the World Confederation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies. Dr Scott Waltman will be speaking as a Global Ambassador of that organization. The talk will be geared toward clinicians, Stoics, and mental health consumers.

Recent Recorded Webinars

  • Includes Credits

    Pediatric anxiety disorders are common, with prevalence rates ranging from 9-20% (Bitsko et al., 2022; Costello, Egger, & Angold, 2005). Excessive symptoms of anxiety that are impairing but do not meet diagnostic thresholds are also common (Costello & Shugart, 1992; Rapee et al., 2012) and the COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant increases in anxiety (and other youth mental health problems; Ravens-Sieberer et al., 2021; Castagnoli et al., 2020). Moreover, it is well established that untreated anxiety has a broad range of negative effects on academic, social, and familial functioning (Swan & Kendall, 2016). Despite the high prevalence of impairing anxiety, the majority of these youth remain unidentified and untreated. One approach to address the service utilization gap, is to deliver interventions in schools. School-based interventions improve access to care –especially for youth in rural and under-resourced communities where mental health specialists are sparse. This webinar will present the basic components of school-based interventions for youth with anxiety. The talk will also focus on efforts to enhance the capacity of non-mental health specialists, such as school nurses and teachers, to assist youth with anxiety.

  • Includes Credits

    This workshop describes ethical issues in treating suicidal patients and distinguishes between the roles of laws, risk management, and ethics. Using safety planning-type interventions as an example, the presenter will illustrate how psychotherapists can enhance the quality of their interventions by paying particular attention to ethical principles.

  • Includes Credits

    This workshop is designed for clinicians with moderate direct clinical experience conducting CBT or ACT with school-aged/teenage youth and caregivers. It’s a universal problem for parents. Their intentions are well-meaning. Their verbally-stated values and personal principles might even be clear and well-reasoned. And yet... in the moment of truth, it can all go wrong. Tempers flare, feelings are hurt, and defensive, angry or avoidant reactions result. How can therapists help parents and caregivers stay true to their values, even when things start to go off course? The current workshop aims to provide a conceptual framework and tools for helping caregivers (a) assess their values, as distinguished from specific goals, and (b) identify common parenting/family interaction traps that impede responding in line with stated values. We will introduce participants to the ACT Matrix (Polk et al., 2016) as a way of assessing, conceptualizing, and illustrating caregivers’ experiences and behaviors as they relate to values. We will provide additional guidance on how to help caregivers articulate their values, using role-plays and experiential exercises. Attendees will then be introduced to common parenting traps (e.g., accommodation cycle; aggressive-coercive cycle; Chu & Pimentel, 2023) and practice using functional analysis to help caregivers identify where they depart from stated values. Finally, we will demonstrate how to integrate values clarification with results from the functional analysis, to present cognitive and behavioral solutions that bring caregivers’ actions back in line with their stated values. The presenters will share worksheets and handouts from Dr. Chu’s newly published text and other sources to illustrate common parent interaction traps and family-based chain analysis. Attendees will also be encouraged to bring local examples for group consultation. Presenters will moderate a discussion of integrating values-based assessment and intervention into their daily practice with families.

  • Includes Credits

    Acceptance-based behavioral therapy (ABBT) is an umbrella term that encompasses mindfulness-, acceptance-, and contextual-based cognitive therapies (Roemer & Orsillo, 2020). ABBT’s principles and strategies have been adapted to effectively address Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) by reducing GAD, worry, depressive symptoms, and comorbid diagnoses, while also increasing quality of life (e.g., Roemer, Orsillo, & Salter-Pedneault, 2008; Hayes-Skelton, Roemer, & Orsillo, 2013). Further, preliminary studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ABBT’s central elements (i.e., mindfulness and decentering skills, acceptance-based strategies, and values clarification and values-based action) in addressing distress in various contexts, including acculturative and racism-related stress. As a result, we have developed a range of adapted ABBT programs to promote well-being with specific populations. In this workshop, we will present a brief overview of the central principles of ABBT as a foundation for adaptations. We will highlight examples of adaptations to illustrate how these principles may be adapted for use in specific contexts and with specific populations. First, we will discuss adaptations for university students and the way we took ABBT out of therapy room and into in person workshops and online. Then we will share adaptions we made to align with the Latinx student experience. Lastly, we will focus on the ways ABBT can be adapted to address racism-related stress and increase values-based living. We will then engage in a group activity to develop new adaptations that audience members’ can use in their own contexts. This workshop is open to clinicians across all experience levels, including students and trainees.

  • Includes Credits

    Parental and caretaker accommodation in pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is common. It is also known to contribute to greater symptomatology and complicate treatment. While interventions such as SPACE and exposure and response prevention (ERP) focus on specific techniques to target parental and caretaker accommodations, there is less available explicit guidance on its specific functions, causes, and maintaining factors. While arguably not directly necessary for treatment, a deeper understanding of the various functions and processes involved in this type of accommodation may afford greater clinical improvement. Through direct validation of caregivers and targeting of the drives for parental action tendencies, clinicians may be better equipped to facilitate reductions in accommodation behaviors and/or the generation of more effective response substitutions.